Current Actions

  • Tell Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte: No more wolf hunting

    Governor Gianforte,

    Wolves were almost completely exterminated once before -- and if we're not careful, we could see history repeat itself.

    We've already seen the devastating consequences of Montana's reckless wolf hunting policies, which contributed to the killing of 1 in 5 of Yellowstone's wolves last winter. With the deadly snaring season on the horizon, we need to protect our country's wolves from deadly hunts.

    Montana's wolf hunt is cruel and unnecessary. It's endangering the animals that our country has already nearly lost once before. We can't risk losing the wolves again. That's why I'm writing to urge you to stop Montana's wolf hunt before it does irreparable damage to one of our country's most iconic species.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte: No more wolf hunting

    Governor Gianforte,

    Wolves were almost completely exterminated once before -- and if we're not careful, we could see history repeat itself.

    We've already seen the devastating consequences of Montana's reckless wolf hunting policies, which contributed to the killing of 1 in 5 of Yellowstone's wolves last winter. With the deadly snaring season on the horizon, we need to protect our country's wolves from deadly hunts.

    Montana's wolf hunt is cruel and unnecessary. It's endangering the animals that our country has already nearly lost once before. We can't risk losing the wolves again. That's why I'm writing to urge you to stop Montana's wolf hunt before it does irreparable damage to one of our country's most iconic species.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte: No more wolf hunting

    Governor Gianforte,

    Wolves were almost completely exterminated once before -- and if we're not careful, we could see history repeat itself.

    We've already seen the devastating consequences of Montana's reckless wolf hunting policies, which contributed to the killing of 1 in 5 of Yellowstone's wolves last winter. With the deadly snaring season on the horizon, we need to protect our country's wolves from deadly hunts.

    Montana's wolf hunt is cruel and unnecessary. It's endangering the animals that our country has already nearly lost once before. We can't risk losing the wolves again. That's why I'm writing to urge you to stop Montana's wolf hunt before it does irreparable damage to one of our country's most iconic species.

    Sincerely,

  • Add your name: No drilling near Chaco Canyon

    We, the undersigned, urge the Bureau of Land Management to protect greater Chaco Canyon from future drilling. Chaco Canyon is an ecological and cultural treasure. Prohibiting drilling on the land surrounding the canyon is critical to preserving the landscape in its integrity and protecting vulnerable wildlife.

    Chaco Canyon's landscape has already been scarred by previous fossil fuel operations. Oil and gas wells, roads, pipelines, and other infrastructure have destroyed significant cultural sites and transformed others into industrial parks. Please do all you can to ensure that Chaco Canyon is permanently protected from future destruction.

    Sincerely,

  • Add your name: No drilling near Chaco Canyon

    We, the undersigned, urge the Bureau of Land Management to protect greater Chaco Canyon from future drilling. Chaco Canyon is an ecological and cultural treasure. Prohibiting drilling on the land surrounding the canyon is critical to preserving the landscape in its integrity and protecting vulnerable wildlife.

    Chaco Canyon's landscape has already been scarred by previous fossil fuel operations. Oil and gas wells, roads, pipelines, and other infrastructure have destroyed significant cultural sites and transformed others into industrial parks. Please do all you can to ensure that Chaco Canyon is permanently protected from future destruction.

    Sincerely,

  • Add your name: Save the American bumblebee

    We, the undersigned, urge the U.S. FWS to grant the American bumblebee endangered species protections under the Endangered Species Act.

    Over the past two decades, American bumblebee populations have dropped by 90%. In eight states, they've all but disappeared. A combination of toxic pesticides, habitat loss, and climate change have driven the bee to extinction.

    Bold and swift action is necessary to save the American bumblebee. That's why we urge you to list the American bumblebee as endangered and designate critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act.

    Sincerely,

  • Add your name: Save the American bumblebee

    We, the undersigned, urge the U.S. FWS to grant the American bumblebee endangered species protections under the Endangered Species Act.

    Over the past two decades, American bumblebee populations have dropped by 90%. In eight states, they've all but disappeared. A combination of toxic pesticides, habitat loss, and climate change have driven the bee to extinction.

    Bold and swift action is necessary to save the American bumblebee. That's why we urge you to list the American bumblebee as endangered and designate critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Amazon: It's time to put our planet over plastic

    We, the undersigned, urge Amazon to replace single-use plastic packaging with paper alternatives.

    According to a recent report, Amazon generated nearly 600 million pounds of plastic packaging in 2020. Up to 23.5 million pounds of that plastic ended up in the world’s marine environments. There, it contaminated waterways and threatened wildlife.

    We know that Amazon can do better, and we are urging the company to do all it can to support a plastic-free future.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte: No more wolf hunting

    Governor Gianforte,

    Wolves were almost completely exterminated once before -- and if we're not careful, we could see history repeat itself.

    We've already seen the devastating consequences of Montana's reckless wolf hunting policies, which contributed to the killing of 1 in 5 of Yellowstone's wolves last winter. With the deadly snaring season on the horizon, we need to protect our country's wolves from deadly hunts.

    Montana's wolf hunt is cruel and unnecessary. It's endangering the animals that our country has already nearly lost once before. We can't risk losing the wolves again. That's why I'm writing to urge you to stop Montana's wolf hunt before it does irreparable damage to one of our country's most iconic species.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell ConocoPhillips: Protect Arctic wildlife from oil drilling

    Dear ConocoPhillips CEO Ryan Lance,

    As we head into fall, the polar bears that live along Alaska's North Slope are beginning to hunt for a place to build a den where they can safely hibernate for the winter and give birth to their cubs. But along the North Slope, oil exploration and drilling threatens their slumber, along with all the other wildlife that make their home along the North Slope.

    As long as companies are allowed to drill for oil, the North Slope -- and all its human and animal inhabitants -- will be at risk. For that reason, we the undersigned are calling on ConocoPhillips to cancel its Willow Project on Alaska's North Slope.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the U.S. Senate: The time to act on plastic is now

    A recent report shows that the vast majority of the plastic we use, up to 95%, will wind up in a landfill or polluting our environment -- even plastic we put in the blue recycling bin.

    We need to stop making so much plastic in the first place, and we can start by making the people who create all this pollution responsible for cleaning it up.

    Join us in calling on the U.S. Senate to pass the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act to make plastic companies responsible for the waste they create.

  • Gov. Hochul: Sign this landmark electronic waste measure

    We generate way too much waste. But instead of making it easier to repair and maintain our products, manufacturers block access to necessary parts, tools and information, and push consumers to constantly replace products.

    New York legislators passed a landmark Right to Repair bill in June, and we're calling on Gov. Kathy Hochul to sign it.

  • Tell REI: End the use of PFAS in outdoor gear and clothing

    REI CEO Eric Artz:

    The chemicals REI is using to make hiking boots, tents, rain jackets and other gear are a major threat to our environment and health. PFAS have been linked to severe health problems such as cancer, birth defects and liver damage. PFAS are also "forever chemicals" that are resistant to breaking down, polluting our waterways and even building up in our bodies.

    Enjoying the outdoors with the right gear should not harm the very places we love to explore. REI should adopt a policy to get all kinds of PFAS chemicals out of all outdoor apparel and gear.

    There are safe alternatives to using these forever chemicals that can still deliver a waterproof or stain-resistant product and meet the expectations of your customers. Other companies are taking action to protect our planet from the proliferation of PFAS, and REI needs to catch up.

    I urge you to commit to ending the use of PFAS in all of your products by 2024 to protect us from toxic contamination.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Biden administration: Protect our mature and old-growth forests

    President Biden,

    We the undersigned urge you to give our older forests the greatest protections possible through your definition of older and mature forests.

    They act as irreplicable habitat for critical species and also play a key role in the fight against climate change. Old-growth and mature forests act as natural vacuums that suck in carbon from the atmosphere and transform it into energy.

    In fact, our country's forests absorb more than 10% of annual U.S. global warming pollution.

    The U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management need to consider the impacts of commercial logging, an easily preventable threat. Please act quickly to create a federal rule that protects both old-growth and mature trees -- the future old-growth -- from timber harvesting.

    These trees are a critical component in our fight against climate change, we must let them grow to take advantage of their carbon storage capacity.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Biden administration: This is an emergency for wolves

    Montana's Fish and Wildlife Commission just set a goal of killing 456 wolves this winter -- including half a dozen from next to Yellowstone.

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed. Since then, Idaho has passed a law allowing for 90% of its wolves to be killed, and Montana has passed legislation allowing for wolves to be killed in nearly any way imaginable.

    And almost anywhere in Wyoming, any wolf can be shot on sight for any reason -- no permits needed, no questions asked.

    This is an emergency for wolves, and they can't afford to go into another winter of virtually unlimited hunting in the Northern Rockies.

    I'm urging you to restore their Endangered Species Act protections today.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland: The lobos need the greatest protections possible

    It's the rarest species of gray wolf in North America.

    Found in a few parts of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, the lobos, or Mexican gray wolves, have been battling extinction. With numbers as low as the lobos' -- scientists estimate that around 200 of them exist in the wild -- every death has an outsized impact. Right now, the lobos enjoy protections -- but those protections are fatally limited. We need to expand their protections to ensure their subspecies' ability to survive.

    That's why we are urging you to increase the lobos' protections to the greatest extent possible to help them avoid extinction.

  • Tell Governor Inslee: Stop killing endangered wolves

    Dear Governor Inslee,

    Washington state officials shot and killed an endangered wolf in September. From a helicopter, they aimed their guns at a gray wolf pup and fired.

    This deadly incident is another example of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife prioritizing cattle over the endangered species they're sworn to safeguard.

    Please direct your agency to do its job of protecting endangered gray wolves. Wolves are already struggling to recover. The last thing wolves need is for the agencies tasked with protecting them to shoot them dead.

    There are other ways to intervene and prevent wolves from eating livestock, including fences, guard dogs and avoiding grazing in areas near wolf habitat. Shooting endangered wolves is not the solution. Don't let Washington continue to kill endangered wolves.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Governor Inslee: Stop killing endangered wolves

    Dear Governor Inslee,

    Washington state officials shot and killed an endangered wolf in September. From a helicopter, they aimed their guns at a gray wolf pup and fired.

    This deadly incident is another example of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife prioritizing cattle over the endangered species they're sworn to safeguard.

    Please direct your agency to do its job of protecting endangered gray wolves. Wolves are already struggling to recover. The last thing wolves need is for the agencies tasked with protecting them to shoot them dead.

    There are other ways to intervene and prevent wolves from eating livestock, including fences, guard dogs and avoiding grazing in areas near wolf habitat. Shooting endangered wolves is not the solution. Don't let Washington continue to kill endangered wolves.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell General Mills: No unnecessary, single-use plastic packaging

    We, the undersigned, urge General Mills to commit to reducing single-use, plastic packaging. Using less plastic packaging across General Mills' brands and products will help lighten the load of plastics that everyday consumers are forced to deal with. Additionally, by making this pledge, General Mills would set a positive example for other corporations.

    Plastic waste is inundating America's rivers and streams, and clogging up the world's oceans. We need all hands on deck to address this plastic scourge.

    Sincerely,

  • Submit your public comment to urge the EPA to act on toxic PFAS pollution

    Docket No. EPA-HQ-OLEM-2019-0341

    EPA Administrator Michael Regan:

    I urge the Environmental Protection Agency to adopt its proposed rule to designate PFOA and PFOS as hazardous substances under CERCLA. It is essential that we clean up PFAS contamination, including at the 180 Superfund sites where it has already been detected.

    Additionally, the proposed designation of PFOA and PFOS is one of the federal government's first substantial steps toward making polluters pay for past PFAS contamination and discouraging future contamination. When the rule is finalized, it will jumpstart the process of identifying and cleaning up PFAS-polluted sites and in turn will help protect public health from these toxic "forever chemicals."

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Secretary Haaland: Protect our monarchs

    Dear Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    In July, an international body listed monarch butterflies as endangered -- but in the United States, these once-abundant pollinators still don't have the protections they need.

    Habitat loss and overuse of certain pesticides have led to dramatic drops in numbers of western monarchs by as much as 95%. Without action, these iconic pollinators will face the threat of extinction. And if we don't do anything to protect them -- and their habitat and food sources -- then their spectacular migration might disappear altogether, depriving future generations of one of nature's true wonders.

  • Tell the Fish and Wildlife Service: Red wolves need the strongest possible protections

    We, the undersigned, applaud the Fish and Wildlife Service's ongoing commitment to red wolf recovery, and your efforts to update the red wolf recovery plan.

    With only a handful of red wolves still alive in the wild, bringing them back from the brink will require the strongest possible protections.

    We encourage you to explore additional release sites more aggressively -- within the red wolf's historic range, there are many suitable options. In addition to public education to reduce human-caused mortality, we also urge you to work with law enforcement to deter ongoing poaching of red wolves.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Fish and Wildlife Service: Protect these tiny bats from extinction

    Re: Docket # FWS-R5-ES-2021-0163

    We support listing tricolored bats as an endangered species. The tricolored bat is one of the smallest bat species in America and 90% of them are gone. It once flew through the night skies of 39 states -- without these bats, we lose their natural pest control.

    Federal protection will ensure more resources are dedicated to getting white-nose syndrome under control, while also giving tricolored bats a chance to bounce back. Because tricolored bats only give birth to up to two twin pups per year, recovery will take a long time.

    White-nose syndrome is a primary threat to these bats, but habitat loss could put additional stress on bats already headed for extinction. With few older forests remaining in America, we must protect their habitat from logging. You should also designate critical habitat to ensure forest habitat is safeguarded.

    This tiny nocturnal creature needs our help. Please finalize strong federal protections for tricolored bats.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Biden administration: This is an emergency for wolves

    Montana just set a goal of killing 456 wolves this winter -- and that's just the tip of the iceberg for Northern Rockies wolves.

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    And almost anywhere in Wyoming, any wolf can be shot on sight for any reason -- no permits needed, no questions asked.

    There's no question that this is an emergency for wolves, and the Biden administration has the authority to restore their Endangered Species Act protections in the Northern Rockies.

    Tell the Biden administration: This is an emergency for wolves. Restore their Endangered Species Act protections today.

  • Tell Congress: Burning plastic is NOT recycling

    Imagine truckload upon truckload of plastic waste being shoveled into a fire, burned because we have nowhere else to put it. The plastics industry wants to label the process of incinerating plastic as "advanced recycling," in an attempt to fool us into thinking it's good for the planet.

    We need real solutions to deal with the plastic waste piling up in our oceans and landfills. Take action to oppose calling burning plastic "recycling."

  • Tell President Biden: Support a global treaty on plastic pollution

    Every year, approximately eight million tons of plastic pollution floods the world's oceans. That's equivalent to putting five garbage bags full of plastic on every foot of coastline around the globe.

    Tackling our plastic pollution problem requires international cooperation. Send your message today urging President Biden to support a strong global agreement on plastic.

  • Tell Travelers Insurance: No insurance for Arctic drilling

    We, the undersigned, urge Travelers Insurance to commit to not insuring any oil and gas exploration project in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is a truly wild and special place. Its 19 million acres are home to 42 species of fish, 45 mammals, and more than 200 types of birds.

    To keep this wild place wild, a growing list of insurance companies and banks have declined to help do business in the Arctic Refuge. Travelers Insurance should follow this lead. Oil and gas drilling in the Arctic is bad for business, wildlife, and the environment.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell NOAA to protect the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

    We, the undersigned, thank the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for its efforts thus far to save the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, and we urge NOAA to do more. The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary is a special place. It is home to more than 6,000 species of marine life, and contains mangroves, seagrass beds and more.

    Unfortunately, this wild place and the wildlife it supports are at risk. The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary is threatened by overuse, water pollution and more. In order to save this special place, NOAA ought to include large areas like the Tortugas Corridor, and two shore-to-reef protected areas from Key Largo to Carysfort Reef and Long Key State Park to Tennessee Reef in its final rule. NOAA should also adopt a Sanctuary-wide regulation that would require idle speeds within 100 yards of all shorelines throughout the Sanctuary, which would prevent seagrass scars and wildlife scares in these important habitats.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Army Corps of Engineers: Halt Enbridge's Line 5 pipeline

    Enbridge's Line 5 pipeline tunnel poses unacceptable risks to Michigan's environmental integrity.

    Every day, the pipeline shuttles 23 million gallons of Canadian crude oil and natural gas liquids from Superior, Wisconsin, to Sarnia, Ontario. Along that route, it passes vast stretches of crucial wetlands and waterways -- all of which are threatened by the oil that would be released by a pipeline spill. Researchers have demonstrated the danger posed by this pipeline. One researcher at the University of Michigan found that more than 700 miles of shoreline would be vulnerable if this pipeline spilled in Michigan's Straits of Mackinac.

    This habitat is irreplaceable, and needs to be protected from the devastating consequences of a leak from this pipeline. That's why we're writing to urge the Army Corps of Engineers to halt this project.

  • Tell the Biden administration: Otters deserve continued protection

    We oppose delisting the southern sea otter. After they were hunted to near extinction for their fur, the southern sea otters have been protected since 1977. But even after all those years of recovery, these otters are still missing from most areas along the West Coast.

    Though the otters' range has expanded to twice its size since the '70s, their habitat is still a measly 13% of its original size.

    Protecting sea otters benefits entire ocean ecosystems. Otters are a keystone species, balancing the kelp forests and keeping sea urchin populations in check. Sea otters help increase kelp and seagrass and are even helping fight climate change.

    Delisting the southern sea otters would leave them vulnerable and unprotected. With only 3,000 southern sea otters swimming in the Pacific, otters still need our help.

    We urge you to keep southern sea otters protected under the Endangered Species Act.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the U.S. House: Protect the National Environmental Policy Act

    The National Environmental Policy Act is a bedrock environmental law that has protected wild spaces and wildlife in the United States for years.

    But now, lawmakers are seeking to weaken the rule, putting special places across the United States -- as well as the vulnerable species that call them home -- at risk. This law needs to be strengthened, not weakened.


    Tell your U.S. House representative to protect America's wild places and wildlife and strengthen the National Environmental Policy Act.

  • Tell the Biden administration: This is an emergency for wolves

    Montana's Fish and Wildlife Commission just set a goal of killing 456 wolves this winter -- including half a dozen from next to Yellowstone.

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed. Since then, Idaho has passed a law allowing for 90% of its wolves to be killed, and Montana has passed legislation allowing for wolves to be killed in nearly any way imaginable.

    And almost anywhere in Wyoming, any wolf can be shot on sight for any reason -- no permits needed, no questions asked.

    This is an emergency for wolves, and they can't afford to go into another winter of virtually unlimited hunting in the Northern Rockies.

    I'm urging you to restore their Endangered Species Act protections today.

  • Tell the Biden administration: This is an emergency for wolves

    Montana just set a goal of killing 456 wolves this winter -- and that's just the tip of the iceberg for Northern Rockies wolves.

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    And almost anywhere in Wyoming, any wolf can be shot on sight for any reason -- no permits needed, no questions asked.

    There's no question that this is an emergency for wolves, and the Biden administration has the authority to restore their Endangered Species Act protections in the Northern Rockies.

    Tell the Biden administration: This is an emergency for wolves. Restore their Endangered Species Act protections today.

  • Tell NOAA: Save Right whales from vessel strikes

    We, the undersigned, urge NOAA to better protect North Atlantic Right whales by mandating speed restrictions and expanding the size of the boats that must follow those restrictions. North Atlantic Right whales are one of the most endangered whales in the world, with fewer than 350 individuals left.

    Vessel strikes are currently a leading cause of death among Right whales. By requiring more boats to abide by stricter regulations, NOAA can help prevent future strikes, saving Right whales for current and future generations.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Interior Department: No new offshore oil drilling

    Re: Docket # BOEM-2022-0031

    When we drill, we spill -- and that spells devastation for our sea turtles, seabirds and ocean ecosystems. New offshore drilling leases in U.S. oceans will lock us into decades more risk of oil spills and day-to-day pollution.

    With renewable energy on the rise, we don’t need to jeopardize our marine life or our coastal communities. Indeed, if we are going to escape the worst effects of climate change, we can’t afford to keep investing in this dirty, dangerous practice for years to come.

    I was heartened to see that you are considering holding no new lease sales from 2023 to 2028. For the sake of our ocean and our climate, I urge you to protect our coast and halt leasing for oil and gas drilling in our ocean.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the governor: Sign AB 2146 to help save California's bees

    Our bee populations are collapsing. In a statewide survey of California bees, eight entire species of bee were declared missing.

    We can't let any more of California's bees disappear. Bees play a central role in our ecosystems. The California Legislature just passed a bill that would ban some of the worst uses of bee-killing neonic pesticides, but the governor hasn't signed it yet. We need him to hear loud and clear that the public wants strong action on bees.

    Tell the governor: Help save California's bees.

  • Tell Congress: Make wildlife refuges safe for bees

    Why are toxic, bee-killing pesticides being used in the spaces where bees should be safest?

    We need to make sure that our country's best pollinators have places where they're safe from these chemicals. Send a message urging your U.S. House representative to ban the use of pesticides in wildlife refuges.

  • Tell President Biden: Cut down on the government's plastic consumption

    Our world's plastic pollution problem is endangering wildlife and the environment around us.

    Every year, roughly 8 million tons of plastic waste enter our oceans -- the equivalent of dumping five garbage bags of trash on every foot of the world's coastlines annually. The best thing we can do to fight the flood of plastic polluting our environment is to stop using so much of it.

    That's why I'm writing to urge the General Services Administration to reduce the amount of single-use plastics purchased by the federal government.

  • Help end the use of bee-killing pesticides

    Bees are our most important pollinators, but they are dying at unsustainable rates. Domestic honeybee hives have dropped from 6 million colonies in the 1940s to about 2.5 million today.

    One of the main causes of mass colony collapse is the use of a class of bee-killing pesticides called neonicotinoids. Call on your governor to support a ban on the worst uses of neonicotinoids today.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolves' protections

    Dear Secretary Haaland,

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year’s end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    This is far from the only example of the harm facing wolves in the states of the Northern Rockies. Idaho has passed a law allowing for 90% of its wolves to be killed, and Montana has passed legislation allowing for wolves to be killed in nearly any way imaginable.

    This past hunting season, nearly 1 in 5 of Yellowstone’s wolves were killed after a recent change in Montana law repealed their protections in the areas immediately bordering the park after they strayed across the invisible, manmade park boundary.

    If this isn't an emergency for our wolves, then what is? We need to protect these canines before they're wiped out for good. That’s why I’m urging you to declare an emergency and restore the gray wolves’ protections under the Endangered Species Act.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolves' protections

    Dear Secretary Haaland,

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year’s end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    This is far from the only example of the harm facing wolves in the states of the Northern Rockies. Idaho has passed a law allowing for 90% of its wolves to be killed, and Montana has passed legislation allowing for wolves to be killed in nearly any way imaginable.

    This past hunting season, nearly 1 in 5 of Yellowstone’s wolves were killed after a recent change in Montana law repealed their protections in the areas immediately bordering the park after they strayed across the invisible, manmade park boundary.

    If this isn't an emergency for our wolves, then what is? We need to protect these canines before they're wiped out for good. That’s why I’m urging you to declare an emergency and restore the gray wolves’ protections under the Endangered Species Act.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Secretary Haaland: Protect our monarchs

    Dear Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    In July, an international body listed monarch butterflies as endangered -- but in the United States, these once-abundant pollinators still don't have the protections they need.

    Habitat loss and overuse of certain pesticides have led to dramatic drops in numbers of western monarchs by as much as 95%. Without action, these iconic pollinators will face the threat of extinction. And if we don't do anything to protect them -- and their habitat and food sources -- then their spectacular migration might disappear altogether, depriving future generations of one of nature's true wonders.

    It's time we protect these iconic pollinators, before it's too late. That's why I'm writing to urge you to institute special protections for western monarch butterflies.

  • Tell Exxon: Don't drill in the Arctic Refuge

    We urge ExxonMobil to commit to no future drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The Arctic Refuge is a safe haven for polar bears, caribou, wolves, migratory birds and much more. That vast diversity of life is worth more than any amount of oil and gas that Exxon might find.

    With its snow-capped mountains and sweeping grasslands, we can't lose this untouched tundra to the planet-warming search for oil.

  • Call on the U.S. Forest Service and BLM: Protect old-growth and mature forests

    Re: Docket ID: 2022-15185

    We the undersigned urge you to give our older forests the greatest protections possible through your definition of older and mature forests.

    They act as irreplicable habitat for critical species and also play a key role in the fight against climate change. Old-growth and mature forests act as natural vacuums that suck in carbon from the atmosphere and transform it into energy.

    In fact, our country's forests absorb more than 10% of annual U.S. global warming pollution.

    The U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management need to consider the impacts of commercial logging, an easily preventable threat. Please act quickly to create a federal rule that protects both old-growth and mature trees -- the future old-growth -- from timber harvesting.

    These trees are a critical component in our fight against climate change, we must let them grow to take advantage of their carbon storage capacity.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell your state senator: Save California's bees

    Our bees are in trouble. This year, scientists were unable to find eight different species of bees in their statewide survey of the pollinators.

    We can't let any more of California's bees disappear. Bees play a central role in the ecosystems in which they live -- and their decline and disappearance are threatening everything that relies on them.

    Now, we need your help to push this bee-saving bill through the California state Senate.

    Tell your state senator to ban the worst uses of bee-killing neonics today.

  • Tell the Senate: Support the MONARCH Act today to help save the endangered Western monarch.

    Scientists from the International Union for Conservation of Nature recently downgraded the monarch butterfly's status to endangered -- a designation that is reflected in the Western monarch's population decline of approximately 95%.

    Despite these grim numbers, the United States still hasn't issued protections for these butterflies. If we don't act soon, they could disappear from our skies for good.

    Call on your senators today and urge them to pass the MONARCH Act to ensure long lasting protections for Western monarchs.

  • Tell Costco: Commit to protecting the boreal

    Costco CEO W. Craig Jelinek,

    The Canadian boreal forest is of incredible importance to current and future generations of people and wildlife. The forest's 1.5 billion acres are a carbon sink, storing enough carbon to offset the global warming pollution of 24 million cars. It also provides critical habitat to caribou, cougars, grizzly bears and more.

    We, the undersigned, are calling on Costco to commit to conserving this special place. Costco can help save the boreal and set an industry-wide example by sustainably sourcing its toilet paper products.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Cabela's and Bass Pro Shop: Ditch snare traps

    To Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's:

    Snare traps for wolves are inhumane, make a mockery of the hunting principle of fair chase, and have no place in outdoors stores like Bass Pro Shop and Cabela's.

    When they do their job properly, these snares wrap tight around a wolf's neck, starving its brain of blood and killing it quickly. More often than not, however, things don't go to plan. Snares that constrict themselves around a wolf's snout or limb will leave the animal trapped in immense pain until the hunter can arrive and kill them. Sometimes this lasts a couple hours, sometimes a couple days.

    These cruel indiscriminate instruments have no place in our country's outdoors -- and that's why I'm urging you to ban the sale of cable snare traps for wolves from Cabela's and Bass Pro Shops.

  • Tell your senators: Protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from drilling

    This could be our last chance to save the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from drilling. The Senate could pass protections for the Arctic Refuge this weekend -- preventing future oil and gas drilling from polluting the tundra and destroying fragile habitat -- but only if they hear from enough supporters.

    That's why we need to show the Senate that the Arctic Refuge deserves to be protected. Tell your U.S. senators: Protect the Arctic Refuge from drilling.

  • Tell NOAA: Right whales need greater protections

    Fishing gear entanglement is one of the leading known causes of death for North Atlantic Right whales. When whales like Meridian get caught up in fishing lines, the modern Polysteel rope is so strong that it can cut through their bodies and even into their bones.

    And over the last 10 years, the North Atlantic Right whale population has dropped to fewer than 350. To give these majestic creatures the greatest chance at survival, we need to give them the strongest protections we can. Join us in calling on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to do so.

  • Tell the Interior Department: No new offshore oil drilling

    Re: Oil and Gas Leasing Program

    When it comes to oil and gas drilling, when you drill, you spill. The proposed leases would open new gas and oil drilling in some of the places where we've seen this maxim come to pass.

    The Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska killed thousands of otters and seals, as many as 22 orcas and a quarter million seabirds. The worst oil spill in U.S. history -- the Deepwater Horizon disaster -- flooded the Gulf of Mexico with more than 134 million gallons of oil, killing tens of thousands of sea turtles and affecting every species of whale and dolphin living in the Gulf.

    At a time when catastrophic climate change is devastating people's lives and animals' ecosystems across the planet, why would we jeopardize habitats and our coastal waters for more planet-warming oil? For that reason, I'm writing to urge you to abandon plans to sell leases for oil and gas drilling in U.S. coastal waters.

  • Tell Cabela's and Bass Pro Shop: Ditch snare traps

    To Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's:

    Snare traps for wolves are inhumane, make a mockery of the hunting principle of fair chase, and have no place in outdoors stores like Bass Pro Shop and Cabela's.

    When they do their job properly, these snares wrap tight around a wolf's neck, starving its brain of blood and killing it quickly. More often than not, however, things don't go to plan. Snares that constrict themselves around a wolf's snout or limb will leave the animal trapped in immense pain until the hunter can arrive and kill them. Sometimes this lasts a couple hours, sometimes a couple days.

    These cruel indiscriminate instruments have no place in our country's outdoors -- and that's why I'm urging you to ban the sale of cable snare traps for wolves from Cabela's and Bass Pro Shops.

  • Protect the Arctic, stop the Willow project

    Re: DOI-BLM-AK-0000-2018-0004-EIS

    The Willow project poses an unacceptable threat to the largest tract of undisturbed public land in the entire country. The construction of drilling sites, roads, pipelines, airstrips and more would do irreversible harm to the sensitive Arctic ecosystem.

    In addition to ecological damage, the Willow project also poses a threat to our planet's climate. The amount of climate warming pollution released by the Willow project over its proposed 30-year lifespan would be equal to the annual emissions of nearly a third of all U.S. coal-fired power plants.

    I strongly urge you to select the proposed Alternative A: No Action Alternative, halting the Willow project and protecting the sensitive Arctic landscape from drilling and destruction.

  • Tell your U.S. House representative: Stop subsidizing fossil fuels

    The Supreme Court has found that the EPA has limited authority to regulate greenhouse gas pollution from fossil fuel-burning power plants -- which means we have to find another way to keep up the fight for a livable climate.

    We can start by telling Congress to stop subsidizing the production of planet-warming fossil fuels.

  • Tell Minnesota's Department of Natural Resources to protect America's wolves

    Roughly half of the wolves alive today in the Lower 48 States live in Minnesota. For now, they're safe, but the state is currently redrafting the rules that will govern how those wolves will live.

    And if their protections are snatched away again as they were in 2021, these rules might just govern how these wolves might die.

    Minnesota's Department of Natural Resources (DNR) just released a draft plan for managing its state's wolf populations over the next decade. To make sure the state's wolves receive the greatest level of protections from future hunts, it's crucial we raise our voices to show officials that protecting future generations of wolves is a high priority.

  • Save Yellowstone's iconic wolf packs from hunting

    Dear Fish and Wildlife Commission,

    As you consider the new proposed wolf hunting and trapping regulations for 2022, we urge you to enact the strongest protections possible for the gray wolf. Montana's wolves are a keystone species, crucial for the state's ecosystems. Wolf Management Units 313 and 316 bordering Yellowstone National Park should be especially protected to ensure the park's wolf packs remain intact.

    This last hunting season was devastating for all of Yellowstone's wolves that unknowingly crossed the border into Montana, and we can't let another hunting season further harm this iconic population.

    The current proposed regulations are certainly a step in the right direction, but we urge you to take the next step and ban the hunting of wolves throughout Montana.

  • Protect the Boundary Waters from toxic mining

    Re: Document Number 2022-13776

    The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness is an irreplaceable ecosystem. Its thousands of lakes and interconnected streams don't just attract thousands of visitors each year -- they are also vital habitat for wildlife from wolves to moose to hundreds of species of birds. Mining poses an unacceptable risk to the Boundary Waters watershed. I strongly support the proposed 20-year withdrawal of the Rainy River watershed from disposition of federally owned minerals under United States mineral and geothermal leasing laws.

  • Tell the EPA to protect our wildlife

    When a species goes extinct, it's gone -- forever -- and any of the other plants or animals that depended on that species for survival are in trouble.

    Neonics, common pesticides used throughout the country, have played a crucial role in the collapse of bee species across the country. On top of this threat to our best pollinators, these pesticides likely pose a risk to as many as 3 out of 4 species listed under the Endangered Species Act.

    So why are we still allowing them to be sprayed in our fields, parks and gardens? Neonics are bad for our best pollinators and bad for our most vulnerable species. For that reason, I'm urging you to ban the sale and use of neonics to regular consumers.

  • Take action for a plastic-free future

    An estimated 200,000 plastic pellets make their way into the world's oceans every year. There, they threaten wildlife and public health.

    Call on your U.S. House representative to take action for a plastic-free future by supporting the Plastic Pellet Free Waters Act. The Plastic Pellet Free Waters Act will require the Environmental Protection Agency to prohibit the discharge of plastic pellets into waterways, storm drains and sewers.

  • Take action to help save the last 15 wild red wolves

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is conducting a 5-year review of the red wolf's conservation status. The agency will decide whether the wolves keep the same level of protection they currently enjoy, lose some amount of protection -- or, in the worst possible case, lose their endangered status entirely.

    The agency is accepting comments from the public until July 12. Take action today to help save the last few wild red wolves.

  • Take action to help save orcas from starvation

    There are four dams along the Lower Snake River that pose a problem for Chinook salmon.

    To remove them, we'll need serious action -- and not just in the states where these dams reside. It requires an act of Congress.

    That's why we're calling on leaders in Washington state and Washington, D.C., to support the action needed to protect the Southern Resident orcas.

    If we act quickly, we can convince our leaders to act this year in Congress to pass legislation that would help the Chinook -- and the orcas -- recover.

    Until July 11, Washington's state leaders and leaders in Congress will be accepting comments on a plan to restore the salmon populations in Puget Sound. Send them the message that orcas need our help.

  • Take action to help save the last 15 wild red wolves

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is conducting a 5-year review of the red wolf's conservation status. The agency will decide whether the wolves keep the same level of protection they currently enjoy, lose some amount of protection -- or, in the worst possible case, lose their endangered status entirely.

    The agency is accepting comments from the public until July 12. Take action today to help save the last few wild red wolves.

  • Tell your U.S. House representative: Stop subsidizing fossil fuels

    The Supreme Court has found that the EPA has limited authority to regulate greenhouse gas pollution from fossil fuel-burning power plants -- which means we have to find another way to keep up the fight for a livable climate.

    We can start by telling Congress to stop subsidizing the production of planet-warming fossil fuels.

  • Tell Chubb: Stop insuring destructive Arctic oil drilling

    Dear Chubb Limited CEO Evan G. Greenberg,

    Some of the last pristine wild places in America are located in the frigid Arctic of Alaska -- but these wilds and the caribou, polar bears and wolves that rely on them are threatened by the prospect of Arctic oil drilling.

    Some of the most crucial caribou calving grounds in Alaska are in the crosshairs of the oil industry. The construction and disruption that accompany oil drilling near birthing grounds risk alienating caribou herds from these crucial sites. That's bad for the caribou, the Arctic habitats they shape, and the health and safety of the entire planet.

    We can't afford any new oil or gas drilling. For that reason, we the undersigned urge you to commit Chubb Limited to refusing to underwrite new fossil fuel projects in the Arctic Refuge.

  • Tell your U.S. senators: Permanently protect the Tongass National Forest

    The largest forest in the United States is at risk of logging and development.

    Covering much of southeast Alaska, the Tongass National Forest covers millions of acres of old-growth trees, glaciers and deep fjords. However, without permanent federal protections, this wild place remains vulnerable to construction and deforestation.

    Take action to protect the Tongass by sending a message urging your U.S. senators to support the Roadless Area Conservation Act. If passed, this bill will permanently protect the Tongass from construction and development.

  • Tell the EPA: Protect Bristol Bay

    Docket No. EPA--R10--OW--2022--0418

    We, the undersigned, urge the Environmental Protection Agency to veto Pebble Mine and protect Bristol Bay.

    Bristol Bay holds more than just the largest wild sockeye salmon runs in the world. It's home to grizzly bears, bald eagles and moose, all of whom depend on the pristine waters to survive. If built, Pebble Mine would permanently pollute Bristol Bay's waters and imperil the greatest wild salmon fishery left on Earth. It is also one of the last remaining truly wild spaces, with no roads in or out of the bay.

    Pebble Mine threatens this wild place and the wildlife that depend on it. The EPA should veto the mine and take steps to permanently protect this unique ecosystem.

  • Tell the EPA: Protect Bristol Bay

    Docket No. EPA--R10--OW--2022--0418

    We, the undersigned, urge the Environmental Protection Agency to veto Pebble Mine and protect Bristol Bay.

    Bristol Bay holds more than just the largest wild sockeye salmon runs in the world. It's home to grizzly bears, bald eagles and moose, all of whom depend on the pristine waters to survive. If built, Pebble Mine would permanently pollute Bristol Bay's waters and imperil the greatest wild salmon fishery left on Earth. It is also one of the last remaining truly wild spaces, with no roads in or out of the bay.

    Pebble Mine threatens this wild place and the wildlife that depend on it. The EPA should veto the mine and take steps to permanently protect this unique ecosystem.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to protect the sage grouse

    For years, the greater sage grouse’s habitat has been burned and built over.

    Over the past century, the endless expansion of development, oil and mineral drilling operations, and livestock grazing grounds has consumed vast swathes of the Northwest’s sagebrush country, cutting sage grouse habitat in half. Recent changes from climate change, including droughts and wildfires, are putting further pressure on this fragile habitat.

    As a result, this iconic bird is becoming rarer and rarer. We need to protect it before it’s gone for good. That’s why I’m writing to urge you to restore the 2015 sage grouse management plan and protect the last remaining sage grouse habitat from development.

  • Tell your senators: Protect our pollinators

    Springtime just wouldn't be the same without bees.


    But everywhere in our country, the overuse of toxic pesticides has contributed to a massive decline in the numbers of all sorts of bee species. The first step to saving our bees is reducing the toxic pesticides we use.
    Show your appreciation for our bees by telling your U.S. senators to protect them from pesticides and pass the Saving America's Pollinators Act.

  • Protect Oculina Bank from destruction

    Docket ID #: NOAA-NMFS-2021-0126

    With its stunning biodiversity and fragile coral reefs, Oculina Bank must be protected. Opening the area up to rock shrimp trawling would be devastating to the local ecosystem.

    Fishing activity nearly destroyed Oculina Bank in the 1970s and '80s before protections were established, and the coral is still recovering today. We cannot afford to open it up to shrimp trawling and lose this area for good.

    We urge you not to establish fishery access within the Oculina Bank Habitat Area of Particular Concern.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolves' protections

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    Extreme wolf hunting legislation in the states of the Northern Rockies, including Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, will allow this killing to continue with virtually no limits.

    If this isn't an emergency for our wolves, then what is? We need to protect these canines before they're wiped out for good.

  • Tell President Biden: No new offshore oil drilling

    Offshore oil spills devastate marine ecosystems and are fatal to countless marine animals. But what if we could take the first step toward preventing the next major spill?

    We have the opportunity to get the Biden administration to stop all new offshore oil drilling for the next five years.

    Join us in calling on the Biden administration to halt offshore drilling leases.

  • Take action to support the survival of Right whales

    Send a message to your U.S. House representative today in support of the Right Whales Coexistence Act. If passed, this legislation will fund the development and implementation of technologies to protect Right whales from fishing gear entanglements and vessel strikes -- two of the greatest threats to Right whales.

  • Tell Chevron: No drilling in the Arctic Refuge

    We, the undersigned, urge Chevron to commit to no future drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The Arctic Refuge is a safe haven for polar bears, caribou, wolves, migratory birds and much more. That vast diversity of life is worth more than any amount of oil and gas that Chevron might find.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Biden administration: Keep single-use plastics out of our national parks

    We visit America's national parks to see nature and escape the noise and pollution of modern life.

    But even in national parks, you're likely to see a vivid reminder of our planet's pollution problem: trash cans overflowing with plastic waste. One National Park Service spokesperson estimated that the agency manages more than 100 million pounds of waste from visitors each year -- roughly equivalent to the weight of 250 blue whales. Of that waste, roughly 17% is plastic, much of which will never be recycled.

    National parks are the last places where we should find single-use plastic pollution. That's why I'm urging you to ban the sale of single-use plastics from America's national parks.

  • Tell Home Depot: No logging the boreal forest

    Home Depot CEO Craig Menear,

    We, the undersigned, urge The Home Depot to stop sourcing wood products from Canada's boreal forest.

    The Canadian boreal forest is the world's largest remaining intact forest. But it's being lost at a rate of 1 million acres per year. That's the equivalent of one and a half football fields every minute.

    Home Depot can help protect this special place and the boreal caribou, lynx and birds that rely on it. By committing to preserving the boreal, Home Depot can spark industry-wide change.

    Sincerely,

  • Save the northern long-eared bat from extinction

    Document ID: FWS-R3-ES-2021-0140

    The northern long-eared bat is being ravaged by white-nose syndrome. If drastic action isn't taken soon, we could lose this species forever.

    This disease is wiping out the bats at an unprecedented rate, and could soon affect its entire range. With endangered species protections and strong conservation measures, we can turn around the fate of this species.

    I urge you to enact the strongest protections for the northern long-eared bat.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolves' protections

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    Extreme wolf hunting legislation in the states of the Northern Rockies, including Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, will allow this killing to continue with virtually no limits.

    If this isn't an emergency for our wolves, then what is? We need to protect these canines before they're wiped out for good.

  • Protect the rarest gray wolves in North America

    Re: Docket No. FWS-R2-ES-2022-0018

    With fewer than 200 left, the lobo is the rarest subspecies of gray wolf in America. They need strong protections to allow them to thrive for generations to come.

    I support a lobo management plan that gives robust protection to these endangered wolves. An ideal plan would:

    • Remove restrictions on wolves leaving the designated population area, opening up habitat north of I-40.
    • Include provisions to release more wolves to supplement the wild population.
    • Use stronger measures to prevent poaching, including stopping the practice of giving wolf telemetry data to members of the public who can use that data to hunt wolves rather than avoid them.

    However, I support many of the benefits in the proposed plan: It lifts the population cap on wild lobos, and restricts the forms of allowable take.

    I urge you to enact the strongest possible set of protections for endangered lobos.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolves' protections

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    Extreme wolf hunting legislation in the states of the Northern Rockies, including Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, will allow this killing to continue with virtually no limits.

    If this isn't an emergency for our wolves, then what is? We need to protect these canines before they're wiped out for good.

  • Tell the FWS to protect the American bumblebee

    In the past two decades, American bumblebee populations have dropped by 90%.

    Pesticides, climate change, disease and habitat loss have all been putting increasing pressure on the bumblebees in recent years. In the Midwest and Southeast, as much as half of all American bumblebees have disappeared. In other states, that number rises dramatically -- in New York, as many as 99% of the bumblebees have disappeared. And in eight states, the bee has vanished entirely.

    American bumblebees play an important role in many ecosystems' food webs, providing food for birds and reptiles and helping the growth of a number of plants. They also play an important role in pollinating a range of crops and wildflowers. But if nothing changes, the continued collapse of species like this bee will have devastating consequences that will ripple across our country's food webs and ecosystems. For that reason, I write to urge you to grant endangered species protections to the American bumblebee.

  • Tell Congress: Turn the Postal Service green

    We're seeing the effects of climate change all around us: warmer winters, harsher storms, more frequent fires.

    Transportation is our country's largest source of greenhouse gas emissions, and if we could electrify some of the vehicles that have to pass through our neighborhoods every day, we could take an important step toward reducing our emissions.

    Tell Congress to pass the Green Postal Service Fleet Act.

  • Call on President Biden to fire Postmaster General Louis DeJoy

    The U.S. Postal Service plans to spend more than $11 billion on up to 148,000 new gas-guzzling vehicles. This comes despite advice from the Environmental Protection Agency, which says we need to be transitioning to zero-emission vehicles.

    It's time to replace the Postmaster General with someone who supports moving to a cleaner, greener future. Call on President Biden to fire Postmaster General Louis DeJoy.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolves' protections

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    Extreme wolf hunting legislation in the states of the Northern Rockies, including Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, will allow this killing to continue with virtually no limits.

    If this isn't an emergency for our wolves, then what is? We need to protect these canines before they're wiped out for good.

  • Tell your state legislators: Protect California bees

    California's bees need your help. Neonics are threatening the survival of bees across our state, but if the California Legislature limits the use of neonics, we can help save the bees.

    Tell your state legislators to protect California bees by limiting the use of neonics.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolves' protections

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    Extreme wolf hunting legislation in the states of the Northern Rockies, including Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, will allow this killing to continue with virtually no limits.

    If this isn't an emergency for our wolves, then what is? We need to protect these canines before they're wiped out for good.

  • Tell your state senator: Give Nebraska farmers the right to repair

    Manufacturers refuse to provide farmers or independent mechanics with all the tools and software needed to fix modern tractors. This monopolistic practice leaves farmers with no choice but to wait for a dealership technician and pay whatever they want to charge -- losing time and money that farmers can't afford to waste.

    That's why we need Nebraska Senator Tom Brandt's Agricultural Equipment Right-to-Repair Act. Send a message to your state senator today, telling them to support farmers' right to repair.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolves' protections

    Last spring, an estimated 1,500 wolves lived in Idaho. By the year's end, a full third of those wolves had been killed.

    Extreme wolf hunting legislation in the states of the Northern Rockies, including Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, will allow this killing to continue with virtually no limits.

    If this isn't an emergency for our wolves, then what is? We need to protect these canines before they're wiped out for good.

  • Support endangered species status for manatees

    Dear Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    We, the undersigned, urge you to support restoring the manatees’ endangered status. According to Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, nearly 1,000 manatees have died in 2021 alone. That’s more than double the five-year annual average.

    This calamity comes four years after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service downlisted the manatee from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act, over the objection of many environmentalists and biologists. In order to give these gentle sea cows the best chance at survival, it’s critical that the manatees’ endangered status be restored and their critical habitat protected.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell USDA: Stop Wildlife Services from slaughtering wolves

    Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first several weeks of their lives, and won't leave their den until they are six weeks old. Completely defenseless, they are fed and cared for by the adults in their pack.

    But even their pack can't defend vulnerable pups from government-authorized slaughter. Eight wolf pups were recently killed by Wildlife Services in the Boise National Forest. And last year, Wildlife Services killed 381 wolves and five endangered lobos. Our vulnerable wolf population can't take this kind of sustained slaughter.

    I urge you to immediately suspend the killing of wolves by Wildlife Services.

  • Tell your U.S. senators: Protect our wolves

    Wolves in much of America just saw federal protections restored. A new bill in Congress would undo that progress.

    As wolf hunts in the states of the Northern Rockies wrap up, we're seeing what happens when wolves lose all protections.

    We need to make sure the wolves that need our protection the most can get it. Tell your U.S. senators to protect our wolves and oppose this bill.

  • Tell your U.S. senators: The Grand Canyon needs permanent protections

    From its red rock cliffs to its rushing canyon streams, Grand Canyon National Park deserves to be protected, not exposed to toxic uranium mining.

    With your help, we can ban new mining near this special place -- permanently. The Grand Canyon Protection Act would protect over a million acres surrounding this iconic park from mining.

    Tell your U.S. senators: Support the Grand Canyon Protection Act.

  • Tell USDA: Stop Wildlife Services from slaughtering wolves

    Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first several weeks of their lives, and won't leave their den until they are six weeks old. Completely defenseless, they are fed and cared for by the adults in their pack.

    But even their pack can't defend vulnerable pups from government-authorized slaughter. Eight wolf pups were recently killed by Wildlife Services in the Boise National Forest. And last year, Wildlife Services killed 381 wolves and five endangered lobos. Our vulnerable wolf population can't take this kind of sustained slaughter.

    I urge you to immediately suspend the killing of wolves by Wildlife Services.

  • Speak up for federal protections for manatees

    Dear Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    We, the undersigned, urge you to support restoring the manatees' endangered status. In 2021, a record 1,101 Florida manatees died. This was the deadliest year on record, and deaths are expected to continue through the winter.

    Action is needed to protect manatees from further harm, and many environmentalists and biologists agree that restoring manatees' endangered status is an important step. Please do all you can to ensure that manatees are relisted as endangered and critical habitat is protected.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell President Biden: We need action on plastics now

    The time for action on plastic pollution is now.

    Roughly 81% of Americans are in favor of national, state and local policies to combat plastic pollution. To protect the wildlife suffering the effects of plastic pollution, join us in calling on the Biden administration to make plastic waste policy a priority in 2022.

  • Tell President Biden: Ban the import of elephant trophies

    Africa's iconic elephants are slowly slipping toward extinction -- so why are American trophy hunters still allowed to import elephant body parts?

    The United States plays a huge role in the global wildlife trade that threatens iconic species like African elephants -- but the Biden administration can take action now that would push back against this terrible trade.

    Tell President Biden: End elephant trophy imports.

  • Tell your senators: Pass the Right Whale Coexistence Act

    One of the most endangered marine mammals, the North Atlantic Right whale is teetering on the edge of extinction.

    Collisions with ships and entanglements in fishing gear are killing these whales faster than they can reproduce -- but new legislation could tip the scales back in the marine mammals' favor.

    Tell your U.S. senators to support the Right Whale Coexistence Act and protect these whales -- before it's too late.

  • Take action to preserve the Tongass

    The Tongass National Forest is our nation's largest remaining intact temperate rainforest. For thousands of years, the Tongass and its trees have given us the gifts of ecological biodiversity and carbon capture.

    With your help, we're working to preserve the integrity of the Tongass for future generations. Urge your U.S. representative to support the Roadless Area Conservation Act, which would protect 9 million acres of the forest from development.

  • Deadline April 18: Support federal listing of rare milkweed

    We, the undersigned, support the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's proposal to list prostrate milkweed under the Endangered Species Act. Prostrate milkweed is a critical plant for butterflies, bees and other pollinators, yet due to human activity, only 24 populations of the plant remain. Listing the plant as endangered will support its conservation and reproductive success.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell USDA: Stop Wildlife Services from slaughtering wolves

    Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first several weeks of their lives, and won't leave their den until they are six weeks old. Completely defenseless, they are fed and cared for by the adults in their pack.

    But even their pack can't defend vulnerable pups from government-authorized slaughter. Eight wolf pups were recently killed by Wildlife Services in the Boise National Forest. And last year, Wildlife Services killed 381 wolves and five endangered lobos. Our vulnerable wolf population can't take this kind of sustained slaughter.

    I urge you to immediately suspend the killing of wolves by Wildlife Services.

  • Tell USDA: Stop Wildlife Services from slaughtering wolves

    Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first several weeks of their lives, and won't leave their den until they are six weeks old. Completely defenseless, they are fed and cared for by the adults in their pack.

    But even their pack can't defend vulnerable pups from government-authorized slaughter. Eight wolf pups were recently killed by Wildlife Services in the Boise National Forest. And last year, Wildlife Services killed 381 wolves and five endangered lobos. Our vulnerable wolf population can't take this kind of sustained slaughter.

    I urge you to immediately suspend the killing of wolves by Wildlife Services.

  • Tell USDA: Stop Wildlife Services from slaughtering wolves

    Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first several weeks of their lives, and won't leave their den until they are six weeks old. Completely defenseless, they are fed and cared for by the adults in their pack.

    But even their pack can't defend vulnerable pups from government-authorized slaughter. Eight wolf pups were recently killed by Wildlife Services in the Boise National Forest. And last year, Wildlife Services killed 381 wolves and five endangered lobos. Our vulnerable wolf population can't take this kind of sustained slaughter.

    I urge you to immediately suspend the killing of wolves by Wildlife Services.

  • Tell USDA: Stop Wildlife Services from slaughtering wolves

    Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first several weeks of their lives, and won't leave their den until they are six weeks old. Completely defenseless, they are fed and cared for by the adults in their pack.

    But even their pack can't defend vulnerable pups from government-authorized slaughter. Eight wolf pups were recently killed by Wildlife Services in the Boise National Forest. And last year, Wildlife Services killed 381 wolves and five endangered lobos. Our vulnerable wolf population can't take this kind of sustained slaughter.

    I urge you to immediately suspend the killing of wolves by Wildlife Services.

  • Tell the BLM: Protect Arctic habitat

    ConocoPhillips' proposed "Willow Project" would be an ecological misadventure. Every creek and cranny in this untouched region of the Arctic hosts natural magic: caribou, migratory birds, polar bears and more need the Western Arctic for survival.

    Oil rigs, and the trucks, pollution and development that follow, could irreparably damage this pristine place. Plus, the last thing the vulnerable tundra wildlife of the Western Arctic need is more climate-warming pollution.

    I urge you to stop the Willow Project and move forward with a plan to return the contested 7 million acres of the Western Arctic to their 2013 NPR-A Integrated Activity Plan protection status today.

  • Tell your U.S. House representative: Protect our country's wolves

    As wolves are being killed in record numbers, a group of representatives is trying to make it nearly impossible to protect them with the law.

    A recent bill introduced in Congress would permanently remove gray wolves from the endangered species list in certain states and make it very difficult to protect them in the rest. With states like Montana and Idaho passing legislation allowing as many wolves to be killed as possible, it's clear that they need more protections, not fewer.

    Tell your U.S. House representative to keep our ecosystems whole and protect our country's wolves.

  • Tell the EPA: Take the lead out of drinking water

    We, the undersigned, urge the EPA to order water utilities to fully replace all lead service lines within ten years -- a goal explicitly set by President Biden. These toxic pipes are the single largest source of lead contamination in the 9 million homes and other buildings that still have them.

    Lead is particularly harmful to our kids. Therefore, at least for those schools governed by federal drinking water rules, the EPA should require water stations with filters to remove lead, and filters on all other taps used for cooking and drinking. The EPA should limit lead in schools' water to 1 part per billion, the level recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    At even low levels of exposure, lead poses a serious health risk, especially to our children. We urge the EPA to enact these strong protections as soon as possible, and no later than the end of this year.

    Sincerely,

  • Support federal legislation to protect bees

    Widespread use of a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids has decimated bee populations. The number of honeybee hives has dropped from 6 million in the 1940s to fewer than 2.5 million today -- and native bees are also being harmed.

    The Protect America's Children from Toxic Pesticides Act would protect the health of bees by banning neonicotinoids. Urge your U.S. senators to support this legislation today.

  • Tell the Postal Service: Go green with your delivery fleet

    Dear Board of Governors for the United States Postal Service,

    Americans rely on the Postal Service for so much. Everything from bills to birthday presents arrive on time because of it. But now the Postal Service has an opportunity to help Americans in a new way.

    Emissions from transportation make up an enormous portion of total U.S. carbon emissions, comprising almost a third of all carbon dioxide released in the country. So as the Postal Service is preparing to revamp its fleet, now is the perfect time to replace those old polluting vans with clean, green electric vehicles.

    That's why I'm writing to urge you to commit to replacing the Postal Service's delivery fleet with 100% electric vehicles. For the sake of our planet's health, it's time for a healthier delivery fleet.

  • Speak up for federal protections for manatees

    Dear Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    We, the undersigned, urge you to support restoring the manatees' endangered status. In 2021, a record 1,101 Florida manatees died. This was the deadliest year on record, and deaths are expected to continue through the winter.

    Action is needed to protect manatees from further harm, and many environmentalists and biologists agree that restoring manatees' endangered status is an important step. Please do all you can to ensure that manatees are relisted as endangered and critical habitat is protected.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell President Biden: Protect the trees of our national forests

    Forests are the backbone of our ecosystems. Trees provide food and shelter for all sorts of creatures, habitat for other plants, and a natural climate solution for the planet.

    We can't let these precious forests be logged to extinction. We need to protect our old and mature trees, especially on federal lands.

    Tell President Biden to protect old trees on our federal land.

  • Tell Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte: Stop the wolf hunting

    Gov. Greg Gianforte,

    I am writing out of serious concern for the wolves that are being killed in Montana.

    In just the first months of the state's hunting season, hunters killed nearly 1 in 5 of Yellowstone's wolves. Three-quarters of those deaths occurred after wolves crossed the park's boundary into Montana. Those deaths wouldn't have occurred without the recent changes in Montana law making it much, much easier to kill wolves.

    Even aside from the deaths of Yellowstone's iconic wildlife, the mass killing of wolves throughout the rest of the state is threatening to throw Montana's ecosystems out of balance and push wolves to the brink of extinction.

    For that reason, I urge you to stop Montana's wolf hunt and institute protections to prevent further bloodshed.

  • Support endangered species status for manatees

    Dear Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    We, the undersigned, urge you to support restoring the manatees' endangered status. According to Florida's Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, nearly 1,000 manatees died in 2021 alone. That's more than double the five-year annual average.

    This calamity comes four years after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service downlisted the manatee from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act, over the objection of many environmentalists and biologists. In order to give these gentle sea cows the best chance at survival, it's critical that the manatees' endangered status be restored and their critical habitat protected.

    Sincerely,

  • Add your name: Gray wolves need emergency protections from hunting

    Hundreds of wolves are being slaughtered across Idaho, Wyoming and Montana, which have all radically expanded wolf hunting this year. That includes at least 24 Yellowstone wolves that were killed after straying across the park's manmade boundaries.

    Interior Secretary Haaland has the power to issue emergency protections for gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act while the government finishes a longer review. Urge her to take action today.

  • Support federal action on plastic pollution

    The Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act promises to ban many of the worst single-use plastics, including plastic carryout bags and polystyrene foam take-out containers. It also places a moratorium on new plastic-producing facilities. Urge your U.S. House representative to support this legislation today.

  • Tell USDA: Stop Wildlife Services from slaughtering wolves

    Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first several weeks of their lives, and won't leave their den until they are six weeks old. Completely defenseless, they are fed and cared for by the adults in their pack.

    But even their pack can't defend vulnerable pups from government-authorized slaughter. Eight wolf pups were recently killed by Wildlife Services in the Boise National Forest. And last year, Wildlife Services killed 381 wolves and five endangered lobos. Our vulnerable wolf population can't take this kind of sustained slaughter.

    I urge you to immediately suspend the killing of wolves by Wildlife Services.

  • Support endangered species status for manatees

    Dear Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    We, the undersigned, urge you to support restoring the manatees’ endangered status. According to Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, nearly 1,000 manatees have died in 2021 alone. That’s more than double the five-year annual average.

    This calamity comes four years after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service downlisted the manatee from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act, over the objection of many environmentalists and biologists. In order to give these gentle sea cows the best chance at survival, it’s critical that the manatees’ endangered status be restored and their critical habitat protected.

    Sincerely,

  • Protect our national parks from plastic pollution

    From Yosemite to Acadia, all of our national parks deserve our protection. But right now, our parks are suffering under the weight of plastic pollution.

    Tell your U.S. House representative to support the Reducing Waste in National Parks Act to ban the sale of single-use plastics within our parks.

  • Tell President Biden: Save the orcas

    Southern Resident orcas are starving because dams on the Snake River are preventing Chinook salmon -- their main food source -- from spawning. With only 73 Southern Resident orcas left in the wild, we have to act fast to save this irreplaceable species.

    Tell President Biden to breach the dams and save these orcas.

  • Tell the EPA: Protect our water

    Clean water is vital to our health and the environment. That is why our nation came together 50 years ago to pass the Clean Water Act.

    And that is why I support the EPA's proposal to officially rescind the Trump administration's Dirty Water Rule, which left so many of our nation's waters without federal protection from polluters.

    But securing clean water will require more than just reversing this egregious rollback. In any final rule, please make sure the Clean Water Act once again protects all of our waterways -- including the wetlands that sustain our ecosystems and the streams that help provide drinking water to millions of Americans.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Texas General Land Office to protect the golden-cheeked warbler

    Commissioner George P. Bush,

    We, the undersigned, are concerned about the recent steps taken by the General Land Office to remove the golden-cheeked warbler from the endangered species list, and we are asking for the GLO to protect this native songbird. Without current protections, it is likely that they will quickly become extinct. We urge you to drop the current lawsuit and instead work to protect the golden-cheeked warbler and its habitat from development.

  • Tell the Bureau of Land Management: Keep oil drilling away from Chaco Canyon

    The millennium-old ruins, clay-colored cliffs and dark starry skies of Chaco Culture National Historical Park make it a place where time stands still -- but this place won't stay timeless if it becomes home to drilling rigs.

    From its mesas and cliffsides to the streams that flow through its canyons, the park is home to a host of different plants and animals. Elk graze among the shrubs and drink from the streams, snakes slither among the rocks, and bobcats silently stalk the rabbits that hide among the grasses and bushes. Already, this desert wildlife has been pushed into Chaco Canyon as the habitat around it has been lost thanks to human development.

    This park, its wildlife and its iconic ruins need protection from the degradation that comes with development. That's why I'm urging you to adopt President Biden's recently proposed rules to ban oil and gas leases within a 10-mile radius around the park.

  • Tell Red Lobster: Protect the North Atlantic Right whale

    Dear Red Lobster CEO Kelli Valade,

    North Atlantic Right whales are critically endangered, and Red Lobster could play an important role in saving them.

    One of the main causes of death for this marine mammal is entanglement in the ropes used to connect lobster traps on the ocean floor to buoys on the surface. When the whales become entangled, these ropes wrap themselves and slowly constrict the animal, often leading to a slow, painful death. It doesn't need to be this way. New ropeless fishing technology can allow fishermen to keep reeling in their catch without threatening these vulnerable whales.

    As one of the largest purchasers of seafood in the world, you can set a new industry standard for safe, sustainable lobster fishing. That's why I'm urging you to commit only to purchase lobsters from ropeless traps.

  • Save the Boundary Waters from toxic mining

    The Boundary Waters are in danger. This irreplaceable wilderness is an interconnected system of lakes and streams, so if any contamination were to seep out of the mine, it could flow through the entire ecosystem.

    We need your help to ban mining from the Boundary Waters watershed. Add your name to tell the Bureau of Land Management to protect this treasured place.

  • Restore protections to the Tongass

    The Tongass National Forest is full of trees older than America and is a refuge to bears, eagles, moose and so much more. If we do not restore the Roadless Rule to this green marvel, we leave the largest intact temperate rainforest in the world vulnerable to destruction and countless animals without a home.

    I urge you to fully protect the Tongass by restoring the full environmental protections of the Roadless Rule across the 9.2 million roadless acres.

  • Tell Amazon to ditch single-use plastic packaging

    Dear Amazon CEO Andy Jassy,

    It's time for Amazon to do its part to fight the plastic pollution crisis.

    According to a recent report, Amazon increased its plastic waste by a third in 2020. Much of that waste winds up polluting our waterways and endangering the wildlife that call them home. We can't allow single-use plastic packaging to foul our planet's oceans for centuries.

    That's why I'm writing to urge you to replace the single-use plastics that Amazon uses for its packaging with paper alternatives. It's time for Amazon to do the right thing and protect our planet from plastic pollution.

  • We need to protect the Delaware Water Gap

    The Delaware Water Gap is a cherished landmark that gets nearly as many visitors each year as Yosemite and Yellowstone -- so now I'm urging you to protect it like those other two majestic parks.

    From the fattest black bears to the tiniest ruby-throated hummingbirds, the Gap provides ideal habitat for some of the most iconic animals in the American Northeast. The Gap is home to more than 20 miles of the iconic Appalachian Trail -- the historic path ranging from Georgia to Maine. And on top of all that, millions of Americans, from New York City to Philadelphia, rely on the Delaware Water Gap for their drinking water.

    The Delaware Water Gap is of tremendous importance, and millions come to appreciate it from across the country every year.

    Now a movement is working to convince federal officials to designate the Delaware Water Gap as a national park. Sign our petition in support of this proposal today.

  • Support endangered species status for manatees

    Dear Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    We, the undersigned, urge you to support restoring the manatees’ endangered status. According to Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, nearly 1,000 manatees have died in 2021 alone. That’s more than double the five-year annual average.

    This calamity comes four years after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service downlisted the manatee from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act, over the objection of many environmentalists and biologists. In order to give these gentle sea cows the best chance at survival, it’s critical that the manatees’ endangered status be restored and their critical habitat protected.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell USDA: Stop Wildlife Services from slaughtering wolves

    Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first several weeks of their lives, and won't leave their den until they are six weeks old. Completely defenseless, they are fed and cared for by the adults in their pack.

    But even their pack can't defend vulnerable pups from government-authorized slaughter. Eight wolf pups were recently killed by Wildlife Services in the Boise National Forest. And last year, Wildlife Services killed 381 wolves and five endangered lobos. Our vulnerable wolf population can't take this kind of sustained slaughter.

    I urge you to immediately suspend the killing of wolves by Wildlife Services.

  • Tell President Biden to stop the slaughter of wolf pups

    Last month, federal agents killed eight defenseless wolf pups. Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first two to three weeks of their lives, and stay in their den until they are six weeks old.

    Cruel laws allow the slaughter of wolves across many states, but until we can restore Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves, we need to make sure the next generation of pups are protected.

    Tell the Biden administration to immediately suspend the killing of wolves on public lands.

  • Tell President Biden to stop the slaughter of wolf pups

    Last month, federal agents killed eight defenseless wolf pups. Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first two to three weeks of their lives, and stay in their den until they are six weeks old.

    Cruel laws allow the slaughter of wolves across many states, but until we can restore Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves, we need to make sure the next generation of pups are protected.

    Tell the Biden administration to immediately suspend the killing of wolves on public lands.

  • Tell the Bureau of Land Management to protect the greater sage grouse

    DOI-BLM-WO-2300-2022-0001-RMP-EIS

    According to some estimates, historical numbers of greater sage grouse in the United States could have been as high as 16 million. By 2000, that number had fallen to between 100,000 and 500,000.

    The loss of these birds' habitat is central in their decline. In Utah, Montana and Wyoming alone, development and climate change have destroyed as much as 90% of these birds' habitat. Decades of loosening protections have contributed to this loss of habitat and left the grouse vulnerable.

    Sage grouse need the sage shrublands for shelter, to hide from predators, to raise their young, and to attract mates in their strange, iconic dances. Without that habitat, the grouse are struggling to survive. For that reason, I urge you to update the Bureau of Land Management's management plans for the greater sage grouse to protect this iconic species.

  • Restore protections to the Tongass

    The Tongass National Forest is full of trees older than America and is a refuge to bears, eagles, moose and so much more. If we do not restore the Roadless Rule to this green marvel, we leave the largest intact temperate rainforest in the world vulnerable to destruction and countless animals without a home.

    I urge you to fully protect the Tongass by restoring the full environmental protections of the Roadless Rule across the 9.2 million roadless acres.

  • Tell the EPA: It's time to crack down on methane pollution

    Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2021-0317

    Methane gas is one of the biggest factors behind our warming climate -- fueling the climate change that's threatening endangered species across the planet and driving violent wildfires, worsening droughts and melting sea ice. Thanks to this climate change, we've seen storms flood cities from Louisiana to New York, and we've seen wildfires in the West darken the skies of cities across the eastern seaboard.

    The time to fight climate change is now -- and the EPA's newly introduced rules regulating methane emissions from the oil and gas industry will help keep planet-warming methane gas out of our air. They'll represent an important step in lowering our country's greenhouse gas emissions -- and they will be essential in helping our planet avert the most catastrophic climate disaster.

    For that reason, I urge you to pass the strongest possible regulations governing methane emissions in the oil and gas industry.

  • Restore Endangered Species Act protection for Rocky Mountain wolves

    In Wyoming, dozens of gray wolves are legally shot to death every single year in hunting zones on the doorstep of Yellowstone National Park. In Idaho, the state proposed "wolf-free zones" where an unlimited number of wolves can be killed, no questions asked. It's clear that the wolves of the northern Rocky Mountain region desperately need protection if they are going to survive and thrive for generations to come -- protection the Endangered Species Act can provide.

    I strongly support restoring Endangered Species Act protection for the gray wolf Northern Rocky Mountain Distinct Population Segment.

  • Tell the U.S. Fish and Wildlife: Protect America's birds

    Docket No. FWS-HQ-MB-2021-0105

    Birds need our help to protect them from human industry. We need to strengthen the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and enact strong protections to prevent bird deaths. Over 1,000 species of birds rely on the act to keep them flying safe throughout the country.

    Without the protections of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, birds are vulnerable to the dangers of human industry. The act needs to hold industries responsible for bird deaths, and have strong regulations to prevent incidental take as much as possible.

    I urge you to enact the strictest regulations possible for the incidental take of birds.

  • Tell President Biden to stop the slaughter of wolf pups

    Last month, federal agents killed eight defenseless wolf pups. Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first two to three weeks of their lives, and stay in their den until they are six weeks old.

    Cruel laws allow the slaughter of wolves across many states, but until we can restore Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves, we need to make sure the next generation of pups are protected.

    Tell the Biden administration to immediately suspend the killing of wolves on public lands.

  • Tell President Biden to stop the slaughter of wolf pups

    Last month, federal agents killed eight defenseless wolf pups. Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first two to three weeks of their lives, and stay in their den until they are six weeks old.

    Cruel laws allow the slaughter of wolves across many states, but until we can restore Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves, we need to make sure the next generation of pups are protected.

    Tell the Biden administration to immediately suspend the killing of wolves on public lands.

  • Restore Endangered Species Act protection for Rocky Mountain wolves

    In Wyoming, dozens of gray wolves are legally shot to death every single year in hunting zones on the doorstep of Yellowstone National Park. In Idaho, the state proposed "wolf-free zones" where an unlimited number of wolves can be killed, no questions asked.

    It's clear that the wolves of the northern Rocky Mountain region desperately need protection if they are going to survive and thrive for generations to come -- protection the Endangered Species Act can provide.

    I strongly support restoring Endangered Species Act protection for the gray wolf Northern Rocky Mountain Distinct Population Segment.

  • Restore Endangered Species Act protection for Rocky Mountain wolves

    In Wyoming, dozens of gray wolves are legally shot to death every single year in hunting zones on the doorstep of Yellowstone National Park. In Idaho, the state proposed "wolf-free zones" where an unlimited number of wolves can be killed, no questions asked.

    It's clear that the wolves of the northern Rocky Mountain region desperately need protection if they are going to survive and thrive for generations to come -- protection the Endangered Species Act can provide.

    I strongly support restoring Endangered Species Act protection for the gray wolf Northern Rocky Mountain Distinct Population Segment.

  • Restore Endangered Species Act protection for Rocky Mountain wolves

    In Wyoming, dozens of gray wolves are legally shot to death every single year in hunting zones on the doorstep of Yellowstone National Park. In Idaho, the state proposed "wolf-free zones" where an unlimited number of wolves can be killed, no questions asked.

    It's clear that the wolves of the northern Rocky Mountain region desperately need protection if they are going to survive and thrive for generations to come -- protection the Endangered Species Act can provide.

    I strongly support restoring Endangered Species Act protection for the gray wolf Northern Rocky Mountain Distinct Population Segment.

  • Restore Endangered Species Act protection for Rocky Mountain wolves

    In Wyoming, dozens of gray wolves are legally shot to death every single year in hunting zones on the doorstep of Yellowstone National Park. In Idaho, the state proposed "wolf-free zones" where an unlimited number of wolves can be killed, no questions asked.

    It's clear that the wolves of the northern Rocky Mountain region desperately need protection if they are going to survive and thrive for generations to come -- protection the Endangered Species Act can provide.

    I strongly support restoring Endangered Species Act protection for the gray wolf Northern Rocky Mountain Distinct Population Segment.

  • Tell BOEM: Protect the belugas of Cook Inlet

    Docket # BOEM-2020-0018-0049

    Cook Inlet, the body of water that leads up to Anchorage, is home to a unique population of beluga whales that has been on the decline for decades.

    Since 1979, Cook Inlet's belugas have dropped in number by 80%, and their population is still struggling to recover. One of the major threats facing these iconic Arctic whales is the pollution and habitat destruction that results from oil and gas exploration and drilling. Cook Inlet's iconic beluga's are already struggling for their survival -- and new oil and gas projects in Cook Inlet that will pollute and fracture their habitat could be the final nail in their coffin.

    One million acres of land are currently up for sale to entities that would develop them for oil and gas drilling. To protect Cook Inlet's endangered beluga whales, I urge you to cancel the lease sales in Cook Inlet.

  • Protect the rarest gray wolves in America

    Re: Docket No. FWS-R2-ES-2021-0103

    With only 186 individuals left, the Mexican gray wolf, or lobo, is the rarest subspecies of gray wolf in America. These amazing animals need strong protections to support their recovery and allow them to thrive for generations to come.

    I support a Mexican gray wolf management plan that provides robust protection for these endangered animals. An ideal plan would remove restrictions on wolves leaving the designated population area and include provisions to closely monitor the genetic health of the wild lobos. However, I support the proposed plan for its many benefits: It lifts the population cap on wild lobos, and restricts the forms of allowable take. Without an artificial ceiling on the number of wild lobos that will be allowed to exist, the population will have a much better chance to recover.

    I urge you to enact the strongest possible set of protections for endangered Mexican gray wolves.

  • Tell the U.S. Department of Agriculture to stop this dirty train

    The U.S. Forest Service recently approved a request to allow a proposed railroad, the Uinta Basin Railway, to cut through Ashley National Forest on its way to delivering oil extracted in Utah to world markets.

    Construction of this railway would rip up the forest's beautiful landscape, displacing the wildlife that live there and scarring the land -- but the real problem begins when construction ends. The group pushing for this development estimates that the railway could transport 350,000 barrels of oil every day. This oil would contribute to a climate crisis that is already wreaking havoc on our country's drought-addled western states.

    It's time to stop destroying our country's few remaining wild places just to dig up a little more planet-killing oil. For that reason, I urge you to reject any right of way through the Ashley National Forest for the proposed Uinta Basin Railway and decline to amend the Forest Plan to accommodate the project.

  • Tell your U.S. House representative: Support the MONARCH Act

    Western monarch numbers have fallen by 99% in recent years.

    We need urgent action to keep this iconic pollinator from slipping into extinction. The MONARCH Act would provide funds and resources to support this butterfly's recovery -- and it might be one of their best shots at recovery.

    Tell your U.S. representative to support the MONARCH Act.

  • Save California Rooftop Solar

    The deadline is fast approaching to use your voice in defense of rooftop solar's future in California. The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) is considering making changes to an important solar policy called net metering, which fairly compensates solar panel owners for the excess energy they contribute to the grid.

    We need to defend the policies that will make increased solar adoption a reality in California. Cutting net metering will only send us backwards. Send a message urging Gov. Newsom and the CPUC to save California rooftop solar.

  • Restore Endangered Species Act habitat protections

    Docket No. FWS-HQ-ES-2019-0115

    Endangered species don't stand a chance unless we can protect their habitats. We need to restore the Endangered Species Act to its full strength to save imperiled wildlife and the places they call home.

    We urge you to rescind the final rule titled "Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Regulations for Designating Critical Habitat". Endangered species can't afford to wait.

  • Tell President Biden to stop the slaughter of wolf pups

    Last year, federal agents killed eight defenseless wolf pups. Wolf pups are blind and deaf for the first two to three weeks of their lives, and stay in their den until they are six weeks old.

    Cruel laws allow the slaughter of wolves across many states, but until we can restore Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves, we need to make sure the next generation of pups are protected.

    Tell the Biden administration to immediately suspend the killing of wolves on public lands.

  • Tell Congress: End offshore drilling

    For the second time in just two months, oil is spilling into the Pacific.

    On Saturday, November 20, the Coast Guard began investigating an oil slick in the coastal waters off of Huntington Beach, California -- the same place where, just last month, 25,000 gallons of crude spewed out of a broken pipeline.

    The last spill killed marine wildlife, damaged beaches and contaminated local wetlands.

    The best way to prevent oil spills like this one is to not drill in the first place. Call on your U.S. House representative to end offshore drilling.

  • Tell Montana's Fish and Wildlife Commission: Protect Yellowstone's wolves

    In the 20th century, wolves were nearly driven to extinction in the Lower 48 states.

    The eradication of wolves in Yellowstone National Park threw the park's ecosystem into chaos. Recognizing their importance, scientists reintroduced wolves in 1995, and since then the park's wolves have enjoyed special protections from being hunted. But these protections are limited to the park's boundaries -- and wolves, unlike humans, don't recognize borders.

    This year, the state of Montana lifted hunting and trapping restrictions in Montana wolf management units 313 (Gardiner) and 316 (Cooke City), the two areas bordering Yellowstone. As a result, wolves put themselves at immediate risk of being killed if they wander too far from the park, as happened with three young wolves in early September.

    Wolves are of vital importance to the health of Yellowstone National Park. To protect them and the overall ecosystems of Yellowstone, restrictions to hunting and trapping wolves should be restored in Montana wolf management units 313 and 316.

  • Tell the EPA: "Chemical recycling" isn't recycling at all

    DOCKET ID NO. EPA-HQ-OAR-2021-0382

    We, the undersigned, urge the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate chemical recycling facilities with the same standards applied to incineration under the Clean Air Act.

    Chemical recycling is a threat to both environmental and public health. The process of burning plastic waste releases toxic substances, including dioxins and volatile organic compounds, into the atmosphere. These pollutants have been linked to cancer, respiratory disease, nervous disorders and other harms.

    Additionally, over half of the waste being processed through chemical recycling facilities comes out as climate pollution. This advances rather than mitigates global warming.

    Please do all you can to regulate chemical recycling and chemical recycling facilities.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell your U.S. senators: Support "Make Polluters Pay"

    Giant fossil fuel companies are some of the biggest polluters, yet average Americans are the only ones paying for the impacts of climate change.

    The "Make Polluters Pay" plan would balance the scales and make the polluting giants pay into a climate fund to aid the transition to renewable energy and help communities impacted by climate change.

    Help us hold the biggest polluters accountable by telling your U.S. senators to include this in the Build Back Better Act.

  • Tell the FWS: Protect the manatees by protecting their habitat

    Between Jan. 1 and Oct. 8 of this year, 968 manatees have died. In short, Florida's manatees are starving to death.

    Pollution from farms and sewers has been fueling algal blooms that darken the waters and starve the coast's seagrass of sunlight. Without seagrass, the manatees have no food. In an important overwintering site for the marine mammals, the seagrass has declined by 58% as a result of this process. The threats to this habitat sit at the root of the danger facing Florida's manatees -- yet the FWS hasn't yet evaluated the threats facing the areas it designates as the manatees' "critical habitat," nor has it updated its definition of the manatees' critical habitat since 1976.

    To respond to this mass die-off event -- and to prevent the next one -- the FWS will need accurate and up-to-date information about the manatees' habitat, the threats facing it and how to protect it. For that reason, I write to urge the FWS to revise and expand the manatees' critical habitat.

  • Tell the FWS to protect the American bumblebee

    In the past two decades, American bumblebee populations have dropped by 90%.

    Pesticides, climate change, disease and habitat loss have all been putting increasing pressure on the bumblebees in recent years. In the Midwest and Southeast, as much as half of all American bumblebees have disappeared. In other states, that number rises dramatically -- in New York, as many as 99% of the bumblebees have disappeared. And in eight states, the bee has vanished entirely.

    American bumblebees play an important role in many ecosystems' food webs, providing food for birds and reptiles and helping the growth of a number of plants. They also play an important role in pollinating a range of crops and wildflowers. But if nothing changes, the continued collapse of species like this bee will have devastating consequences that will ripple across our country's food webs and ecosystems. For that reason, I write to urge you to grant endangered species protections to the American bumblebee.

  • Help save red wolves from poaching

    Fewer than 10 red wolves remain in the wild. If this species doesn't receive the strong protection it needs, it will be in real danger of being driven extinct.

    A recent survey revealed that, although most people living in the red wolves' recovery area support wolf conservation, a portion of hunters claim they will still kill any wolf they see. I strongly urge you to enact stronger anti-poaching measures in the red wolf's natural habitat.

  • Tell the EPA: Neonics aren't safe for our bees or for our planet

    Docket ID EPA-HQ-OPP-2021-0575

    Across the United States, neonics are contaminating entire ecosystems, with terrible costs for a range of crucial and endangered species.

    First and foremost, these pesticides pose a terrible threat to all sorts of bees. In the United States, the widespread use of neonics over the last quarter-century has left the American agricultural landscape 48 times more toxic to our best pollinators. These agricultural applications, along with their use in non-commercial gardens, has helped these water-soluble chemicals spread to nearby streams, rivers and lakes across the country, where they adversely affect a vast majority of endangered species and their habitats.

    These harmful pesticides are taking a toll on some of our most endangered and critical species. For that reason, I urge you to restrict them only to their most necessary uses.

  • Tell the EPA: Neonics aren't safe for our bees or for our planet

    Docket ID EPA-HQ-OPP-2021-0575

    Across the United States, neonics are contaminating entire ecosystems, with terrible costs for a range of crucial and endangered species.

    First and foremost, these pesticides pose a terrible threat to all sorts of bees. In the United States, the widespread use of neonics over the last quarter-century has left the American agricultural landscape 48 times more toxic to our best pollinators. These agricultural applications, along with their use in non-commercial gardens, have helped these water-soluble chemicals spread to nearby streams, rivers and lakes across the country, where they adversely affect a vast majority of endangered species and their habitats.

    These harmful pesticides are taking a toll on some of our most endangered and critical species. For that reason, I urge you to restrict them only to their most necessary uses.

  • Tell Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo: Right whales don't have time to lose

    Every time a critically endangered North Atlantic Right whale dies, the species slips closer to extinction.

    Frequently, these whales die when they become entangled in fishing lines that stretch from the surface down to the ocean floor. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recently announced rules designed to protect these whales from entanglements, but they won't do enough to stop the species' steep decline -- they would only delay extinction.

    Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo oversees NOAA -- tell her that the Right whales need stronger protections to avoid extinction.

  • Tell the EPA: Neonics aren't safe for our bees or for our planet

    Docket ID EPA-HQ-OPP-2021-0575

    Across the United States, neonics are contaminating entire ecosystems, with terrible costs for a range of crucial and endangered species.

    First and foremost, these pesticides pose a terrible threat to all sorts of bees. In the United States, the widespread use of neonics over the last quarter-century has left the American agricultural landscape 48 times more toxic to our best pollinators. These agricultural applications, along with their use in non-commercial gardens, have helped these water-soluble chemicals spread to nearby streams, rivers and lakes across the country, where they adversely affect a vast majority of endangered species and their habitats.

    These harmful pesticides are taking a toll on some of our most endangered and critical species. For that reason, I urge you to restrict them only to their most necessary uses.

  • Tell Montana's Fish and Wildlife Commission: Protect Yellowstone's wolves

    In the 20th century, wolves were nearly driven to extinction in the Lower 48 states.

    The eradication of wolves in Yellowstone National Park threw the park's ecosystem into chaos. Recognizing their importance, scientists reintroduced wolves in 1995, and since then the park's wolves have enjoyed special protections from being hunted. But these protections are limited to the park's boundaries -- and wolves, unlike humans, don't recognize borders.

    This year, the state of Montana lifted hunting and trapping restrictions in Montana wolf management units 313 (Gardiner) and 316 (Cooke City), the two areas bordering Yellowstone. As a result, wolves put themselves at immediate risk of being killed if they wander too far from the park, as happened with three young wolves in early September.

    Wolves are of vital importance to the health of Yellowstone National Park. To protect them and the overall ecosystems of Yellowstone, restrictions to hunting and trapping wolves should be restored in Montana wolf management units 313 and 316.

  • Protect our water from toxic chemicals

    EPA-HQ-OW-2021-0547

    Every day, millions of Americans rely on our rivers, lakes and streams for safe drinking water. When PFAS "forever chemicals" contaminate these waters, we're left with exposure to chemicals linked to cancer, birth defects and more.

    Generations to come could benefit from your agency stopping the senseless dumping of these chemicals into our waters. And existing technology can virtually eliminate discharges of these dangerous chemicals. So as your agency revises the Preliminary Effluent Guidelines Program Plan, please set pollution control standards that stop all industries from dumping PFAS into our waterways.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell P&G: Stop deforestation in Canada's boreal forest

    Dear Procter & Gamble,

    Stretching from coast to coast across the northern reaches of North America, Canada's boreal forest is a crucial ecosystem that supports a diverse range of life.

    Small animals like hares and squirrels make their home there alongside moose, bison, caribou and a vast number of birds and insects. The forest also aids a healthy planet in less direct ways. The enormous concentration of trees makes the forest one of the planet's largest carbon sinks. In the summer, when its trees are photosynthesizing at their greatest extent, the forest alters the levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere across the entire planet.

    For these reasons and more, this forest is of tremendous significance -- and it's worth more than something we'll use once and flush away. For that reason, I urge you to commit to using only recycled or forest-free fibers in Charmin, Bounty and other tissue brands.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Bureau of Land Management: Protect Alaska's ecosystems

    Climate change is warming the Arctic at twice the rate of the rest of the planet -- with the Pacific region off Alaska's coast warming faster than many other Arctic regions.

    As it warms, it threatens to change forever the face of the Arctic. The melting of Alaska's sea ice is depriving walruses and seals of important habitat, and it's threatening polar bears with extinction. Even worse, the warming of Arctic waters threatens to destabilize the food web and impact all of its animals -- from the smallest krill to the largest whales.

    If we're to stabilize the Arctic's ecosystems and protect its unique and threatened species, we'll need to halt the march of climate change -- and we can't keep doing that as long as we're still extracting more oil. As the Biden administration reviews plans to open the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A) to oil drilling, I urge you to recognize the threat climate change poses to our planet and bar oil development from the NPR-A.

  • Stop uranium from contaminating our ecosystems

    Docket #: 2021-17145

    Funding uranium mining through the Uranium Reserve Program endangers the public, wildlife and entire ecosystems. Every uranium mine operated in the United States has required toxic waste cleanup, some over hundreds of acres of land.

    Putting taxpayer money toward uranium mining is unnecessary and highly dangerous. The Department of Energy should not fund an industry in which radioactive contamination is all but guaranteed.

    The Uranium Reserve Program should be abandoned.

  • Tell Amazon: Stop using single-use plastic packaging

    Amazon creates a massive amount of plastic waste every year. According to a recent study, Amazon's plastic waste -- in air pillows alone -- could encircle the globe 500 times.

    If Amazon stopped using so much plastic, it could have a huge positive impact on oceans, rivers, lakes and marine life.

    Amazon needs to put our planet's well-being over plastic. Tell Amazon: Stop using single-use plastic packaging.

  • Tell the EPA: Neonics aren't safe for our bees or for our planet

    Docket ID EPA-HQ-OPP-2021-0575

    Across the United States, neonics are contaminating entire ecosystems, with terrible costs for a range of crucial and endangered species.

    First and foremost, these pesticides pose a terrible threat to all sorts of bees. In the United States, the widespread use of neonics over the last quarter-century has left the American agricultural landscape 48 times more toxic to our best pollinators. These agricultural applications, along with their use in non-commercial gardens, have helped these water-soluble chemicals spread to nearby streams, rivers and lakes across the country, where they adversely affect a vast majority of endangered species and their habitats.

    These harmful pesticides are taking a toll on some of our most endangered and critical species. For that reason, I urge you to restrict them only to their most necessary uses.

  • Keep drilling out of the Arctic

    To Chairman Philip Byrne:

    The environmental cost of drilling for your new oil discovery in the Arctic would be incomprehensible.

    The Arctic is home to incredible wildlife and a delicate ecosystem. Drilling in the Arctic imperils all of the natural beauty and animals that call it home.

    The Arctic is one of the last truly wild places on earth, and destroying it to fuel climate change is morally reprehensible.

    I urge you not to drill in the Arctic.

  • Tell Interior Secretary Haaland: We need federal wolf protections restored

    Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    The Wisconsin Natural Resources Board just approved killing 300 wolves this fall -- almost half of the wolves that survived this February's slaughter.

    This will be devastating for the state's small population of wolves, and it simply doesn't need to happen.

    While the 12-month review initiated by FWS is a valuable first step, it neither goes far enough nor moves fast enough to meet this moment.

    We urgently need to restore federal Endangered Species Act protections if we're going to save wolves across the Lower 48 from a brutal hunting season.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Interior Secretary Haaland: We need federal wolf protections restored

    Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    The Wisconsin Natural Resources Board just approved killing 300 wolves this fall -- almost half of the wolves that survived this February's slaughter.

    This will be devastating for the state's small population of wolves, and it simply doesn't need to happen.

    While the 12-month review initiated by FWS is a valuable first step, it neither goes far enough nor moves fast enough to meet this moment.

    We urgently need to restore federal Endangered Species Act protections if we're going to save wolves across the Lower 48 from a brutal hunting season.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Interior Secretary Haaland: We need federal wolf protections restored

    Interior Secretary Deb Haaland,

    The Wisconsin Natural Resources Board just approved killing 300 wolves this fall -- almost half of the wolves that survived this February's slaughter.

    This will be devastating for the state's small population of wolves, and it simply doesn't need to happen.

    While the 12-month review initiated by FWS is a valuable first step, it neither goes far enough nor moves fast enough to meet this moment.

    We urgently need to restore federal Endangered Species Act protections if we're going to save wolves across the Lower 48 from a brutal hunting season.

    Sincerely,

  • Restore Endangered Species Act protection for gray wolves

    Hunting and trapping already nearly drove gray wolves to extinction in the Lower 48 once. Without the protection of the Endangered Species Act, wolves are in danger of facing this fate once again. Devastating hunts have already occurred in the short six months since delisting.

    Help protect gray wolves from hunting by urging your U.S. representative to support relisting gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act.

  • (No Title)

    Wisconsin has set a goal of killing 300 wolves this fall -- almost half of the wolves that survived this February's slaughter.

    And Wisconsin is just one of the states to dramatically increase wolf hunting. In late August, Montana's FWC set a quota of 450 wolves -- nearly 40% of the state's wolf population -- to be killed in the state's upcoming hunting season.

    Thanks to new laws passed this year, Montana and Idaho could kill up to 90% of their wolves, and in unbelievably brutal ways.

    Tell Interior Secretary Haaland: We need federal wolf protections restored across the Lower 48 states.

  • (No Title)

    Wisconsin has set a goal of killing 300 wolves this fall -- almost half of the wolves that survived this February's slaughter.

    And Wisconsin is just one of the states to dramatically increase wolf hunting. In late August, Montana's FWC set a quota of 450 wolves -- nearly 40% of the state's wolf population -- to be killed in the state's upcoming hunting season.

    Thanks to new laws passed this year, Montana and Idaho could kill up to 90% of their wolves, and in unbelievably brutal ways.

    Tell Interior Secretary Haaland: We need federal wolf protections restored across the Lower 48 states.

  • Tell Amazon: Stop trashing millions of unused products

    To Amazon CEO Andy Jassy:

    The planet is experiencing an already-debilitating waste crisis, and recent investigations have shown Amazon is fueling that fire by throwing away millions of unused products.

    Electronics are the fastest-growing source of waste in the world, and they leach toxic chemicals into the soil. Plastic waste covers the planet from our highest mountains to our most remote lakes.

    Amazon must stop adding to this crisis by throwing away returned and unused products, and instead reuse or redistribute its unsold products.

  • Protect bees from toxic pesticide cocktails

    Across the country, we're spraying a toxic cocktail of pesticides -- and our beleaguered bees are paying the price for it.

    When pesticides are applied together in our farms and fields -- as they very frequently are -- their impact is significantly amplified. When pesticides mix, they don't just add one toxic effect to another. Instead, each chemical tends to amplify the others' effects, producing cocktails that are more toxic than the sum of their parts. Taken alongside a slew of other pressures, from habitat loss to climate change, these pesticides have an unmistakable result: They're pushing thousands of bee species to the edge of extinction.

    We need action to protect our bees. Tell the EPA to establish rules governing the mixed uses of pesticides.

  • Tell your U.S. House representative: Support the Recovering America's Wildlife Act

    According to the United Nations, roughly 1 million plant and animal species around the world are threatened with extinction -- including one third of America's wildlife species.

    Decades of development across the continent have destroyed countless habitats and fractured many more, dramatically reducing the territories in which many species could successfully live. At the same time, pollution and fossil fuels have degraded habitats across the planet and led to a climate change crisis that is challenging species that are already pushed to the breaking point.

    We need to invest in conservation if we want our country's wildlife to survive for future generations. That's why Congress needs to pass the Recovering America's Wildlife Act -- tell your U.S. representative today.

  • Protect wildlife from deadly traps

    The Refuge From Cruel Trapping Act will outlaw the use of snares, steel-jawed leghold traps, and other deadly body-gripping devices in our national wildlife refuges.

    The wild spaces we share with wolves and other wildlife are no place for devices that can harm and kill people and animals alike. Send a message to your U.S. representative today.

  • Help stop the bottling of San Bernardino National Forest's waterways

    We, the undersigned, urge you to deny any permit applications for waterways within the San Bernardino National Forest. Previous permit approvals have led to the siphoning of millions of gallons of water from Strawberry Creek, which helps provide drinking water to residents and habitat for threatened wildlife. The commitment to preserving San Bernardino's rivers and creeks is particularly critical now, as drought conditions intensify across California and climate change leaves the state more vulnerable to water shortages.

  • Save the western monarch from the brink of extinction

    With only 2,000 western monarchs remaining, these imperiled pollinators need our help fast. The Monarch Action, Recovery, and Conservation of Habitat (MONARCH) Act would enact the Western Monarch Butterfly Conservation Plan, protecting critical monarch habitat.

    Tell your senators to save the western monarchs by supporting the MONARCH Act.

  • The North Atlantic Right whales need strong protections

    There are only about 360 North Atlantic Right whales left in existence. According to a study from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, less than one whale can die every year for these critically endangered whales to avoid extinction. In the last four years alone, 34 have died -- putting the species on the fast track to oblivion.

    We know what's mainly killing these whales: boating collisions and entanglements in fishing equipment. The good news is that they're within our control to change. The bad news is that we're racing against the clock -- and we're losing.

    The North Atlantic Right whales need help soon if they're to avoid extinction. Tell President Biden that they need the strongest possible protections now.

  • Tell the Interior Department: End fossil fuel tax breaks, incentives, subsidies

    The Department of the Interior recently approved discounts on royalties for major coal suppliers. This reduces the fees these companies have to pay for coal production, incentivizing further extraction.

    Now more than ever, it's critical that we don't prop up polluters. Urge the Interior Department to end fossil fuel subsidies, tax breaks and incentives.

  • Tell Congress: Help prevent bird deaths

    Bird-building collisions are a serious conservation concern. As many as 1 billion U.S. birds die annually from crashing into buildings.

    These deaths can be prevented. The Bird-Safe Buildings Act would require that any new federal buildings are constructed with bird-safe materials and design features. Urge your U.S. representative to support this legislation today.

  • Florida's manatees need help now

    One in 10 of Florida's manatees have died in the last six months.

    Years of human pollution have fueled algae blooms that turn crucial manatee habitat into toxic sludge, killing the seagrass the manatees need to eat to survive. As a consequence, the first six months of 2021 broke the previous record for annual manatee deaths.

    It's clear that algal blooms are fueling this crisis for Florida's manatees. That's why I'm urging you to exercise your authority under the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act to designate these algal bloom events as "Hypoxia or Harmful Algal Blooms of National Significance," thus allowing federal aid to be released to stop these blooms and halt their harmful effects on Florida's vulnerable manatees.

  • Tell BlueTriton: Don't drain Colorado dry

    In the last week of July, roughly 43 percent of Colorado was experiencing either extreme or exceptional drought. This means dangerously low reservoirs, dams without enough water to produce electricity, land that can't support its animals, and more parched earth to fuel wildfires.

    Worst of all, as climate change continues to accelerate, this exceptional drought will increasingly be Colorado's new normal.

    Colorado needs all the water it can get. For that reason, I urge you not to bottle and sell Colorado's precious water.

  • Tell your senators: Support the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act

    Plastic is harming our planet. As the biggest producer of plastic waste in the world, the United States needs to step up to stem the flow of plastic pollution. It's time to turn the tide on plastic waste and protect our earth and wildlife.

    Tell your U.S. senators to support the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act in order to protect our world from plastic waste.

  • Tell your U.S. House representative to support the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act

    Tiny plastic pellets are spreading across the Indian Ocean like wildfire, coating coastlines and killing wildlife everywhere they go.

    On our current path, a moment's convenience today will rob from the oceans of tomorrow. We're wading toward a diminished future, where beautiful sea turtles have been driven to extinction and where plastic bags float through dead reefs instead of schools of fish.

    But it doesn't need to be this way. If we get serious about slowing -- and eventually stopping -- our reliance on plastics, we can slow this river of plastic pollution. And by incentivizing companies to reduce their plastic production, that's exactly what the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act can do for us.

  • Add your name to save spotted owl habitat

    Re: Docket No. FWS-R1-ES-2020-0050

    The spotted owl is an irreplaceable part of the forest ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest. Habitat loss has already decimated their population, and they cannot afford any more logging in their forest home. I strongly support the proposal to restore protection to 3.4 million acres of spotted owl critical habitat.

  • Protect the Arctic Refuge from drilling

    An amendment to must-pass legislation could put the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in jeopardy unless we rally enough supporters to defend this pristine northern wilderness.

    If the amendment passes and the Arctic is opened up to drilling, all the animals that call it home could be in danger, from the arctic fox to the wolverine to the polar bear. We can't let the Senate endanger all these animals just for a little more oil.

    Tell your U.S. senators to protect the Arctic by voting down this amendment today.

  • Tell your U.S. House representative: Restore the manatees' protections

    More manatees have now died in the first six months of 2021 than died in all of 2020.

    For years, human pollution has been killing the manatees' food sources, and now the sea cows are dying by the hundreds. Worst of all, manatees are dealing with these increasing pressures with fewer protections. In 2017, the Trump administration downgraded their listing from endangered to threatened -- stripping them of critical protections.

    Manatees need all the help they can get -- that's why we're urging our representatives to back endangered species status for the beleaguered sea cow.

  • Tell Secretary Haaland: Save the western monarch butterflies

    In the 1980s, there were 4.5 million western monarch butterflies; last year, there were fewer than 2,000.

    The western monarchs face an emergency, and they will go extinct if nothing is done to save them. Tell Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to use her emergency authority under the Endangered Species Act to grant monarch butterflies immediate protections.

  • Tell Bayer: Make Roundup toxic-free

    Glyphosate, the main chemical ingredient in Roundup, has been recognized by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a probable human carcinogen since 2015.

    To protect the health of its customers, I urge Bayer to reformulate Roundup and its other glyphosate-based weed killers with alternatives that don't pose a risk to human health.

  • Save the Southern Resident orcas

    With only 73 Southern Resident orcas left in the wild, we need to act fast to save these irreplaceable beauties.

    Take action today by telling your U.S. House representative to support Rep. Simpson's plan to help save our orcas.

  • Take action to save your state's bees

    2020 was a harsh year for bees. Between April 2020 and April of this year, beekeepers reported hive losses of nearly 50 percent.

    For the sake of bees and our greater environment, it's time to tackle the most pressing threats to our pollinators. Send a message urging your governor to support a ban on the worst uses of toxic pesticides called neonicotinoids.

  • Stop the sale of single-use plastics in our national parks

    Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland has the power to prohibit the sale and distribution of single-use plastics by the National Park Service. By banning single-use plastics in our national parks and forests, Secretary Haaland can protect our treasured lands for generations to come.

    Plastics take hundreds of years to decompose, so we need to tell Secretary Haaland to make a difference now to stop the pileup of plastics in our natural wonders.

    Take action today to protect our parks tomorrow.

  • Tell Congress: Save America's pollinators from toxic neonics

    Toxic pesticides like neonicotinoids (or neonics) are a huge factor in the collapse of bee populations. The faster we limit the use of neonics, the more bees we can save. With your help, we can build a safe, secure future for your favorite pollinators.

    Take action today by sending a message to your U.S. House representative urging them to support the Saving America's Pollinators Act.

  • Stop BlueTriton from draining Strawberry Creek

    I strongly urge you to stop drawing quantities of water far beyond your permitted amount from Strawberry Creek. With over 97 percent of California in a state of drought, water is more precious than ever. The San Bernardino national forest ecosystem, and all the residents and wildlife that depend on it, are counting on your sustainable use of the area's natural resources.

  • Tell the FWS: Protect the greater sage grouse

    The greater sage grouse's habitat has been shrinking for years, and that loss of habitat is fueling a terrible decline. Since Americans began settling the West, sage grouse numbers have declined by as much as 95 percent.

    This unique bird is an icon of the American West -- so to save it and the ecosystem it relies on, we need to protect the sage grouse.

  • Tell Montana's Fish and Wildlife Commission: Protect the wolves

    In 2020, Montana's wolves faced a challenging year. During the 2020 season, hunters killed 320 wolves -- a notable uptick from the average of 242 wolves killed in the last eight years.

    With the state's wolves already on the decline, it's crucial for the health of Montana's ecosystems to prevent a total collapse of wolf populations. Overzealous hunting once drove wolves from Montana completely.

    That's why, for the health of this great state, I urge you not to enact these proposed regulations.

    Sincerely,

  • Help us bring the sea otters back to Oregon

    Sea otters are one of the most beloved animals on earth. Unfortunately, over a hundred years ago, people hunted sea otters to near-extinction off of the Oregon coast. We, along with our ocean, are still paying the price.

    Without otters around to keep them in check, purple sea urchin populations have exploded in recent years, mowing down critical kelp forests and creating a nearshore wasteland where few other species can survive. Without kelp, many fish and sea creatures are left without shelter, habitat, or their primary food source.

    I support efforts to reintroduce sea otters off the Oregon coast to help bolster the endangered species and restore the health of the kelp forest ecosystems.

  • Tell the Interior Department: No new drilling in the Arctic

    The Arctic is heating at three times the rate of the rest of the planet.

    To avoid catastrophic climate change, the International Energy Agency recently reported that no new drilling projects can be started anywhere on the planet. But the Biden administration just defended a massive Trump-era oil project, known as Willow, in Alaska's North Slope.

    The more than 1 billion barrels of oil that are expected to be produced over the next 30 years from this new site in the Arctic will pose a tremendous barrier to averting climate catastrophe. That's why we need to urge the Interior Department, which is reviewing this project's approval, to stop it from going forward.

  • Protect waterways and wildlife from polystyrene pollution

    Help spare hundreds of marine animals from the harm resulting from polystyrene pollution. Call on your governor to support a ban on foam cups and containers.

  • Restore Endangered Species Act protection for gray wolves

    Hunting and trapping already nearly drove gray wolves to extinction in the Lower 48 once. Without the protection of the Endangered Species Act, wolves are in danger of facing this fate once again. Devastating hunts have already occurred in the short six months since delisting.

    Help protect gray wolves from hunting by urging your U.S. representative to support relisting gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act.

  • Tell the BLM: Protect Dinosaur National Monument

    Dinosaur National Monument is an irreplaceable wonder of tremendous value to this country. A sensitive wildlife habitat, it provides crucial refuge to thousands of native plant and animal species. It's also a cultural landmark with thousands of years of Indigenous history tied to it.

    Most notably, the park is a geologic wonder. The Green and Yampa rivers that wend through the park have carved deep canyons, cutting through 23 layers of weathered rock that reveal billions of years of Earth's history.

    Drilling around the monument has already left its air polluted beyond federal Clean Air standards; another oil rig would only further degrade the environment in and around the monument. Tell the Bureau of Land Management not to allow drilling on Dinosaur National Monument's doorstep.

  • Tell the FWS: Give monarch butterflies endangered status

    The flocks of monarch butterflies migrating across North America this spring are shadows of what they used to be.

    In the last 40 years, monarch populations in the U.S. have dropped by 80 to 99 percent. These dramatic declines have left very little to stand between America's monarchs and extinction.

    That's why we're asking the FWS to grant monarch butterflies endangered status under the Endangered Species Act.

  • Tell your U.S. senators: Take action on plastic pollution

    Each year, approximately 8 million metric tons of plastic waste make their way into our world's oceans. That's the equivalent of five grocery bags filled with plastic for every foot of coastline.

    Fortunately, legislation currently in Congress would take bold action to curb plastic pollution. The Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act (BFFPPA) would reduce single-use plastics, improve recycling rates, hold plastic producers accountable for their waste, and more. Tell your U.S. senators to support the BFFPPA today.

  • Help protect the manatees' habitat

    Dear Gov. DeSantis,

    The Indian River Lagoon should be a sanctuary for Florida's manatees. Normally, they go there and graze on its plentiful seagrass to sustain themselves.

    But a series of algae blooms in recent years has caused the lagoon's seagrass to drop by up to 90 percent, leaving no food for manatees. And these algae blooms are happening all around Florida.

    That's why we need you to limit fertilizer use during the summer and support investment in Florida's wastewater treatment infrastructure.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Gov. Evers: Stop gray wolf hunts in Wisconsin

    Dear Gov. Tony Evers,

    Gray wolves in Wisconsin need better protections. I was disappointed to learn that Wisconsin would hold a wolf hunt this year, and I was outraged to hear that gray wolf harvest from the hunt exceeded the Department of Natural Resources' quota by 82 percent.

    The gray wolf is a beautiful animal that can coexist with humans. There are non-lethal wolf management methods that are more humane than wolf hunts, and these non-lethal methods can even be more effective at protecting livestock from gray wolves.

    Wisconsin should not require a wolf hunt every year. It's clear that hunters can and will go above the allotted number of wolf deaths, and this will have a devastating impact on wolf populations.

    I urge you to do everything you can to end wolf hunts in Wisconsin.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Gov. Evers: Stop gray wolf hunts in Wisconsin

    Dear Gov. Tony Evers,

    Gray wolves in Wisconsin need better protections. I was disappointed to learn that Wisconsin would hold a wolf hunt this year, and I was outraged to hear that gray wolf harvest from the hunt exceeded the Department of Natural Resources' quota by 82 percent.

    The gray wolf is a beautiful animal that can coexist with humans. There are non-lethal wolf management methods that are more humane than wolf hunts, and these non-lethal methods can even be more effective at protecting livestock from gray wolves.

    Wisconsin should not require a wolf hunt every year. It's clear that hunters can and will go above the allotted number of wolf deaths, and this will have a devastating impact on wolf populations.

    I urge you to do everything you can to end wolf hunts in Wisconsin.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Whole Foods Market: Put planet over plastic

    In a recent report by As You Sow, Whole Foods Market received an "F" for its wasteful practices. This grade was based on the company's failure to reduce single-use plastic packaging, adopt reusable packaging, or disclose data on its plastic footprint.

    We're organizing ahead of Whole Foods' board meeting to convince the company to put the planet over plastic. Send your message today to help demonstrate broad support for tackling plastic pollution.

  • Stand up to planned obsolescence in New York

    Manufacturers prefer when we replace our gadgets quickly. It's terrible for the planet.

    In fact, manufacturers use a variety of tactics to block repair, which reduces lifespans and feeds the churn of devices, which has become the fastest growing waste stream in the world. Help us support Right to Repair reforms which lower barriers to repair.

  • We can't go backwards on solar in California

    A new bill here in California, AB 1139, would effectively stall the growth of rooftop solar and make it more difficult for consumers across the state to take advantage of this clean energy technology. Send a message to your representatives today letting them know you oppose this bill.

  • Tell your U.S. representative: Save our lynx

    America's lynx populations are collapsing, and a recently introduced bill could be the last nail in this wild cat's coffin.

    Habitat loss could drive the lynx out of the Lower 48 for good -- and if passed, the Forest Information Reform (FIR) Act would give companies a green light to develop what precious habitat the lynx have left.

    We can't let this bill sell out critical habitat. Tell your U.S. representative today to vote no on the FIR Act.

  • Tell Amazon: Stop the sale of bee-killing pesticides

    Amazon CEO Andy Jassy,

    Bees are vital to our environment and global food supply, yet right now they are dying off at unsustainable rates.

    Neonicotinoid pesticides are one of the root causes of that decline. They've been found to impair bee reproduction, foraging and navigation functioning. Yet right now, they remain on Amazon's virtual shelves.

    We, the undersigned, urge Amazon to use its influence as the largest online retailer in the United States to lead corporate change by banning the sale of products containing neonicotinoid pesticides. By removing these bee-killing products from its virtual shelves, Amazon can go a long way toward protecting vital pollinators and demonstrate its commitment to environmental conservation.

    Sincerely,

  • Urge Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolf protections across the Lower 48 states

    One out of every 5 Wisconsin wolves were killed in just 60 hours this February. It was the first wolf hunt that was a direct result of the Trump administration erasing Endangered Species Act protections for wolves -- but it won't be the last.

    Wisconsin is already planning another hunt for this November -- and this time, the wolf hunt could last for four months. It isn't just Wisconsin wolves that are in states' crosshairs: Earlier this year, Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte personally trapped and shot a wolf illegally -- at the same time that the Montana Legislature is poised to allow unlimited hunting of wolves. And Michigan legislators are rushing to copy Wisconsin by holding a wolf hunt this year.

    With more wolf hunts coming down the pike, we don't have any time to lose. The clock is ticking for gray wolves. President Biden has initiated a review of wolves' endangered species status -- but Interior Department staff immediately responded by defending the decision not to protect them. We need Interior Secretary Haaland to hear from wolf lovers like you.

    Take action now: Urge Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolf protections across the Lower 48 states.

  • Tell Gov. Brad Little: Protect Idaho's wolves

    Dear Gov. Brad Little,

    Highly intelligent, expressive and social animals, gray wolves are an icon of the American wilderness. At one point, nearly 2 million of them roamed the wild plains, mountains and forests of North America.

    Wolves were once nearly driven to extinction in the United States, and Senate Bill 1211 could make that a reality once again. For the sake of Idaho's wildlife, I urge you to veto it.

    Thank you,

  • Tell President Biden: Protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    President Biden,

    Polar bears and caribou need the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to give birth to and raise future generations -- which means we need to protect it today.

    As long as the Arctic Refuge lacks permanent protections from gas and oil drilling, some of the Arctic's most iconic animals could one day find themselves out of a nursery. That's why I urge you to grant it permanent protections.

    Thank you,

  • Add your name to keep "forever chemicals" out of our waterways

    Docket number: EPA-HQ-OW-2020-0582

    Dear EPA Administrator Regan,

    I am calling on you to stop companies from dumping all PFAS "forever chemicals" into our waterways.

    Cancers, low fertility, endocrine disruption, autoimmune diseases, birth defects; PFAS have been linked to all these health problems and more. And they're everywhere, used all over the country to make everything from firefighting foam, to raincoats, to nonstick pans and fast food takeout containers.

    As a result, these toxic chemicals have now contaminated the drinking water of millions of Americans. It has to stop.

    Ultimately, we should work to phase out the use of these dangerous chemicals wherever possible. Barring companies from dumping them directly into our waterways is an urgently needed first step.

  • Tell Costco: Protect the boreal forest

    Every minute, a football field and a half of Canada's boreal forest is cut down -- in part, to make toilet paper.

    The boreal forest is of incredible ecological importance to the entire planet. We shouldn't sacrifice one of North America's most ancient and important ecosystems for something we'll use once and flush away. As a major retailer of toilet paper, Costco has an opportunity to lead the industry away from deforestation and toward sustainable sources.

    By committing to sustainable sourcing for its toilet paper products, Costco can take an important step toward protecting this crucial forest.

  • Tell Congress: It's time to tackle animal trafficking

    Animal traffickers are preparing for a post-pandemic boom, yet current U.S. laws to help us understand and combat animal trafficking are sorely lacking. This makes it harder for us to stem the trade that's threatening some of the planet's most iconic -- and poached -- animals.

    Regardless of their size or power, animals such as lions, elephants, giraffes and pangolins all face an uncertain future because of illegal trafficking.

    If we want to get serious about addressing the trafficking that threatens the planet's most unique animals, then Congress needs to introduce anti-trafficking legislation. Tell your representative: It's time to tackle trafficking.

  • Tell the FWS to protect our manatees

    More than 500 manatees died in the first two and a half months of 2021. That's about six deaths every day. At this rate, we could lose a third of Florida's manatees by the end of the year.

    In many cases, Florida's manatees are threatened by the impact of human activity on their habitats. Various overlapping threats and pressures could pose an existential threat to Florida's manatees.

    Now more than ever, manatees need the protections that come with "endangered" status. For that reason, I urge the Fish and Wildlife Service to classify manatees as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act.

    Sincerely,

  • Urge Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolf protections across the Lower 48 states

    One out of every 5 Wisconsin wolves were killed in just 60 hours this February. It was the first wolf hunt that was a direct result of the Trump administration erasing Endangered Species Act protections for wolves -- but it won't be the last.

    Wisconsin is already planning another hunt for this November -- and this time, the wolf hunt could last for four months. It isn't just Wisconsin wolves that are in states' crosshairs: Earlier this year, Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte personally trapped and shot a wolf illegally -- at the same time that the Montana Legislature is poised to allow unlimited hunting of wolves.

    With more wolf hunts coming down the pike, we don't have any time to lose. The clock is ticking for gray wolves. President Biden has initiated a review of wolves' endangered species status -- but Interior Department staff immediately responded by defending the decision not to protect them. We need Interior Secretary Haaland to hear from wolf lovers like you.

    Take action now: Urge Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to restore wolf protections across the Lower 48 states.

  • Tell the Department of the Interior: Ban drilling in public lands and waters

    We, the undersigned, urge you, the Department of the Interior, to instate a permanent ban on fossil fuel leasing on public lands and waterways. A complete halt on oil and gas drilling on both land and water is critical to reducing climate-warming emissions and protecting the integrity of several national treasures.

    As clean, renewable energy technologies continue to advance and become more accessible, there is no reason to continue to allow dirty, dangerous drilling. We thank the Department of the Interior for enacting a pause on leasing and ask that the moratorium be made permanent for the sake of our climate, wildlife and future generations.

    Sincerely,

  • Say "no" to fracking at Chaco Canyon

    Chaco Culture National Historical Park got a reprieve late last year when Congress passed a one-year moratorium on new drilling outside the park. But the fact that fracking near Chaco has been considered at all is outrageous.

    It's time to secure permanent protections for Chaco Canyon. Send a message to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland urging her to take action.

  • Say "no" to fracking at Chaco Canyon

    Chaco Culture National Historical Park got a reprieve late last year when Congress passed a one-year moratorium on new drilling outside the park. But the fact that fracking near Chaco has been considered at all is outrageous.

    It's time to secure permanent protections for Chaco Canyon. Send a message to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland urging her to take action.

  • Tell your senators: Don't make banks fund dirty, destructive drilling

    In 2020, every major American bank publicly committed to not fund drilling in the Arctic Refuge.

    That wasn't a coincidence: Thousands of Americans who care about our wild places spoke up and convinced them that the refuge's wildlife and splendor aren't worth a few more drops of oil.

    Now, fossil fuel allies in Congress are trying to make it illegal for banks to do the right thing, by passing legislation that would force them to fund dirty, dangerous drilling.

    Tell your senators to oppose this bill.

  • Tell President Biden: Shut down Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline

    In the "land of 10,000 lakes," Enbridge is rushing to build a pipeline that would be disastrous for water quality, ecosystems and our climate.

    Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline in Minnesota crosses more than 800 wetlands and 200 bodies of water -- including hundreds of essential U.S. water sources.

    The Line 3 pipeline is an oil spill waiting to happen -- and President Biden has the power to shut it down before it starts operating. Tell President Biden: Shut down Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline.

  • Add your name to defend gray wolves in Montana

    Gray wolves in Montana -- and across the U.S. -- need protection from hunting and trapping. The species is native to the U.S., and it's an apex predator that plays an important role in its ecosystems.

    I was angered to learn that you shot a black wolf near Yellowstone without the state-required certification. Shooting wolves is wrong -- and I urge you to protect gray wolves in Montana against proposals in the state legislature that would harm the species.

    S.B. 314 would allow hunters and trappers to kill off nearly 4 in 5 gray wolves in Montana. That number is far too high and would cause the species population to suffer. S.B. 267 would reimburse hunters and trappers for killing gray wolves, effectively putting a bounty on the species.

    These proposals are unsustainable wildlife management tactics that would cause gray wolf populations to dwindle. I urge you not to sign these bills into law.

  • Tell your state legislators: Say no to wolf hunts in Minnesota

    Minnesota state lawmakers are currently considering holding a wolf hunt this year.

    In neighboring Wisconsin, 1 in 5 wolves in the state were just killed off in the first wolf hunt since the Trump administration delisted the species. If Minnesota held a hunt, we would lose even more wolves in the Great Lakes region to needless slaughter.

    We need Minnesotans to help us convince your lawmakers that gray wolves deserve protection. Will you send a message to your state legislators today?

  • Tell your U.S. senators: Protect the Arctic

    The Arctic Refuge is one of the largest tracts of pristine wilderness in the world, and it serves as a nursery for some of the Arctic's most iconic animals. But without lasting legal protections, this irreplaceable ecosystem will remain vulnerable to oil drilling, leaving the polar bears and caribou that rely on it out in the cold.

    If oil development is allowed to move forward on the Arctic Refuge's coastal plain, the massive caribou herds that come every year to raise their young could abandon this lush cradle, with echoing repercussions for the environment.

    With drilling advocates mobilizing, we need to act now. Tell your senators to protect our natural treasures.

  • Tell President Biden: Support critical protections for gray wolves

    Gray wolves are in danger of extinction -- especially since the Trump administration stripped them of Endangered Species Act protections. This means that states are now free to manage their wolf populations as they please, and some have already begun hunting and trapping season.

    President Biden can halt the slaughter by beginning the process of restoring endangered species protections for gray wolves. Send a message urging him to take action today.

  • Tell Amazon: Stop using single-use plastic packaging

    Amazon creates a massive amount of plastic waste every year. According to a recent study, Amazon's plastic waste -- in air pillows alone -- could encircle the globe 500 times.

    If Amazon stopped using so much plastic, it could have a huge positive impact on oceans, rivers, lakes and marine life.

    Amazon needs to put our planet's well-being over plastic. Tell Amazon: Stop using single-use plastic packaging.

  • Tell P&G: Use recycled paper in your tissue products

    One of the last truly wild places left on Earth, the beautiful Canadian boreal forest is home to caribou, lynx, wolves and more amazing creatures. But this forest is quickly disappearing -- partially due to clear-cutting trees to make tissue products for companies like Procter and Gamble.

    But P&G shareholders recently voted to ask the company to issue a report on deforestation and forest degradation in its supply chain, which is a huge step toward our goal to save the Canadian boreal.

    Send a message to P&G today to make sure that the company follows its shareholders' recommendation and uses recycled paper in its tissue products.

  • Stop gray wolf hunts in Michigan

    Dear Gov. Gretchen Whitmer,

    Gray wolves across the U.S. need protection, and I urge you to do everything in your power to oppose wolf hunts in Michigan.

    Gray wolves are beautiful creatures, and the species is important to their ecosystems. We can and should coexist with this animal, which is native to the Great Lakes.

    The last time gray wolves were removed from the Endangered Species List in the Great Lakes, 1,500 gray wolves were killed in the region. It's clear that without federal protections, gray wolves suffer.

    Now that the Trump administration has removed federal protections for gray wolves, state leaders need to step up to defend this species. I urge you to protect gray wolves by preventing a wolf hunt.

  • Tell Chevron: No oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is a safe haven for polar bears, caribou, wolves and millions of migratory birds -- to name just a few of the species that depend on it. It's one of the last places we should be drilling for oil and gas.

    Drilling would exact a tremendous cost on this beautiful wilderness and the wildlife that call it home. It would also be a risky and expensive proposition for your company.

    I'm calling on Chevron to pledge not to drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Tell Gov. Evers: Stop gray wolf hunts in Wisconsin

    Dear Gov. Tony Evers,

    Gray wolves in Wisconsin need better protections. I was disappointed to learn that Wisconsin would hold a wolf hunt this year, and I was outraged to hear that gray wolf harvest from the hunt exceeded the Department of Natural Resources' quota by 82 percent.

    The gray wolf is a beautiful animal that can coexist with humans. There are non-lethal wolf management methods that are more humane than wolf hunts, and these non-lethal methods can even be more effective at protecting livestock from gray wolves.

    Wisconsin should not require a wolf hunt every year. It's clear that hunters can and will go above the allotted number of wolf deaths, and this will have a devastating impact on wolf populations.

    I urge you to do everything you can to end wolf hunts in Wisconsin.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Gov. Evers: Stop gray wolf hunts in Wisconsin

    Dear Gov. Tony Evers,

    Gray wolves in Wisconsin need better protections. I was disappointed to learn that Wisconsin would hold a wolf hunt this year, and I was outraged to hear that the gray wolf harvest from the hunt exceeded the Department of Natural Resources' quota by 82 percent.

    The gray wolf is a beautiful animal that can coexist with humans. There are non-lethal wolf management methods that are more humane than wolf hunts, and these non-lethal methods can even be more effective at protecting livestock from gray wolves.

    Wisconsin should not require a wolf hunt every year. It's clear that hunters can and will go above the allotted number of wolf deaths, and this will have a devastating impact on wolf populations.

    I urge you to do everything you can to end wolf hunts in Wisconsin.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Gov. Evers: Stop gray wolf hunts in Wisconsin

    Dear Gov. Tony Evers,

    Gray wolves in Wisconsin need better protections. I was disappointed to learn that Wisconsin would hold a wolf hunt this year, and I was outraged to hear that the gray wolf harvest from the hunt exceeded the Department of Natural Resources' quota by 82 percent.

    The gray wolf is a beautiful animal that can coexist with humans. There are non-lethal wolf management methods that are more humane than wolf hunts, and these non-lethal methods can even be more effective at protecting livestock from gray wolves.

    Wisconsin should not require a wolf hunt every year. It's clear that hunters can and will go above the allotted number of wolf deaths, and this will have a devastating impact on wolf populations.

    I urge you to do everything you can to end wolf hunts in Wisconsin.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Gov. Evers: Stop gray wolf hunts in Wisconsin

    Dear Gov. Tony Evers,

    Gray wolves in Wisconsin need better protections. I was disappointed to learn that Wisconsin would hold a wolf hunt this year, and I was outraged to hear that the gray wolf harvest from the hunt exceeded the Department of Natural Resources' quota by 82 percent.

    The gray wolf is a beautiful animal that can coexist with humans. There are non-lethal wolf management methods that are more humane than wolf hunts, and these non-lethal methods can even be more effective at protecting livestock from gray wolves.

    Wisconsin should not require a wolf hunt every year. It's clear that hunters can and will go above the allotted number of wolf deaths, and this will have a devastating impact on wolf populations.

    I urge you to do everything you can to end wolf hunts in Wisconsin.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Gov. Evers: Stop gray wolf hunts in Wisconsin

    Dear Gov. Tony Evers,

    Gray wolves in Wisconsin need better protections. I was disappointed to learn that Wisconsin would hold a wolf hunt this year, and I was outraged to hear that the gray wolf harvest from the hunt exceeded the Department of Natural Resources' quota by 82 percent.

    The gray wolf is a beautiful animal that can coexist with humans. There are non-lethal wolf management methods that are more humane than wolf hunts, and these non-lethal methods can even be more effective at protecting livestock from gray wolves.

    Wisconsin should not require a wolf hunt every year. It's clear that hunters can and will go above the allotted number of wolf deaths, and this will have a devastating impact on wolf populations.

    I urge you to do everything you can to end wolf hunts in Wisconsin.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Congress: Save animals by building wildlife corridors

    When a highway slices habitat in half, groups of animals are isolated, unable to breed and may die out. Plus, animals may wander across the road and get hit by a car -- which can also cause injuries for the driver.

    But wildlife corridors can successfully connect fractured habitats and decrease collisions. Tell U.S. Congress: We need to protect wildlife by planning and funding wildlife corridors across the country.

  • Stop gray wolf hunts in Michigan

    Dear Gov. Gretchen Whitmer,

    Gray wolves across the U.S. need protection, and I urge you to do everything in your power to oppose wolf hunts in Michigan.

    Gray wolves are beautiful creatures, and the species is important to their ecosystems. We can and should coexist with this animal, which is native to the Great Lakes.

    The last time gray wolves were removed from the Endangered Species List in the Great Lakes, 1,500 gray wolves were killed in the region. It's clear that without federal protections, gray wolves suffer.

    Now that the Trump administration has removed federal protections for gray wolves, state leaders need to step up to defend this species. I urge you to protect gray wolves by preventing a wolf hunt.

  • Tell Amazon: Stop using single-use plastic packaging

    Amazon creates a massive amount of plastic waste every year. According to a recent study, Amazon's plastic waste -- in air pillows alone -- could encircle the globe 500 times.

    If Amazon stopped using so much plastic, it could have a huge positive impact on oceans, rivers, lakes and marine life.

    Amazon needs to put our planet's well-being over plastic. Tell Amazon: Stop using single-use plastic packaging.

  • Tell the FWS: Ban neonics in wildlife refuges

    Our bees are in danger. In 2018, the Fish and Wildlife Service lifted a ban on the use of bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides in wildlife refuges. This decision advances a dangerous trend of pesticide use that over the last 25 years has made America's agricultural landscape 48 times more toxic to bees.

    Safe refuge is one thing our bees can't afford to lose. If America's bees are to have any hope of recovery, America's wildlife refuges must live up to their name.

    I urge you to reverse this decision and ban neonics from wildlife refuges.

  • Tell California's Water Board: Wildlife deserve the strongest possible protections

    To prospect for gold, some miners use a method called suction dredge mining, which vacuums rocks, gravel and sediment from the bottom of rivers or creeks. This practice can kill young fish and disrupt their habitat.

    The California Water Resources Control Board just proposed restrictions on suction dredge mining -- but its proposed rules don't go far enough to protect wildlife.

    We're calling on the Water Board to go further in protecting critical habitat and public lands from this harmful mining practice. Help us protect California's wildlife by making a public comment before March 8.

  • Tell Gov. Evers: Stop gray wolf hunts in Wisconsin

    Dear Gov. Tony Evers,

    Gray wolves in Wisconsin need better protections. I was disappointed to learn that Wisconsin would hold a wolf hunt this year, and I was outraged to hear that gray wolf harvest from the hunt exceeded the Department of Natural Resources' quota by 82 percent.

    The gray wolf is a beautiful animal that can coexist with humans. There are non-lethal wolf management methods that are more humane than wolf hunts, and these non-lethal methods can even be more effective at protecting livestock from gray wolves.

    Wisconsin should not require a wolf hunt every year. It's clear that hunters can and will go above the allotted number of wolf deaths, and this will have a devastating impact on wolf populations.

    I urge you to do everything you can to end wolf hunts in Wisconsin.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the EPA: Ban Roundup

    EPA-HQ-OPP-2020-0585

    FRL-10018-47

    We have to ban glyphosate to protect biodiversity and keep communities safe. The EPA needs to act on its study that glyphosate could harm 93 percent of endangered species by banning the weedkiller.

    Glyphosate kills the milkweed that monarchs need to survive. Research also shows that glyphosate exposure makes bees more prone to deadly infection, which may be contributing to the global decline in bee populations.

    Additionally, glyphosate exposure may be dangerous for human health. The WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer determined that glyphosate is "probably carcinogenic" for humans.

    To protect pollinators, endangered species and our communities, I urge the EPA to ban glyphosate.

  • Tell your U.S. senators: End fossil fuel subsidies

    From extreme drought to unprecedented storms, our communities and biodiversity are currently suffering the devastating effects of climate change.

    It's clear that we need to get off of fossil fuels -- quickly. But the U.S. government is still using federal funds to subsidize the fossil fuel industry to the tune of $20 billion a year.

    We're calling on Congress to end fossil fuel subsidies in this legislative session. Tell your U.S. senators: End fossil fuel subsidies, tax breaks and incentives.

  • Tell President Biden: Restore protections for this ocean sanctuary

    The Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument provides habitat for whales, turtles and dolphins, plus other animals like swordfish and Atlantic puffins that migrate to the marine monument. The Trump administration's decision to open this marine monument to commercial fishing poses threats to marine life in the area. We urge the Biden administration to protect our country's only monument in the Atlantic Ocean by closing off the area to commercial fishing.

  • Tell NOAA: Protect right whales from deadly entanglements

    Docket No. 201221-0351

    NOAA's proposed plan to protect North Atlantic right whales is an important first step, but it doesn't go far enough to address the most pressing threats facing the critically endangered species. As such, I urge NOAA to incorporate the following actions into its plan:

    1. Require larger and longer seasonal closures of right whale habitat. This is necessary to reduce the chances of right whale entanglement in vertical fishing lines.

    2. Transition to ropeless fishing gear. Traditional vertical fishing lines, which extend from the surface to the seafloor, threaten the safety of the species; whales often become entangled in lines while swimming. Ropeless fishing gear can prevent the threat of entanglement, injury and death.

    These protections are necessary to reduce the threat of extinction and safeguard the beloved North Atlantic right whale for generations to come.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell your senators: Permanently protect the Arctic Refuge

    The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is under threat. The Biden administration temporarily halted oil and gas leasing in the refuge -- but it's up to Congress to permanently protect this special place.

    Tell your U.S. senators to permanently protect this pristine wilderness and the wildlife that call it home.

  • New York needs a "polluter pays" model for plastic waste

    Companies are using cheap single-use materials to cut back on costs -- and beaches and marine life are paying the price.

    But a New York state bill aims to address the plastic waste crisis. The bill incentivizes companies to use more recyclable materials, and it redirects money from polluters to underfunded recycling programs.

    Environmental Action supports the "polluter pays" model behind this legislation -- but we're advocating for a few changes that would make this bill stronger. Call on your state legislators: Support an amended version of this legislation.

  • Stand up for imperiled spotted owls

    Northern spotted owls, known for their dark brown eyes and spotted chests, deserve Endangered Species Act protections. Instead, the Trump administration initiated a rule that strips the owls of 3.4 million acres of protected habitat.

    This is a devastating blow to a declining species that has already lost 70 percent of its habitat. We won't stand by and watch the species decline to extinction. Will you stand up for these vulnerable owls?

  • Tell President Biden: Shut down the Dakota Access pipeline

    The Dakota Access pipeline is an oil spill waiting to happen. It pumps gas under the Missouri River, where oil contamination would be catastrophic for wildlife and nearby communities.

    President Biden has the ability to protect wildlife and waterways by shutting the pipeline down. Tell President Biden: Shut down the Dakota Access pipeline.

  • Subscribe to Environmental Action's Green Living newsletter

    Making eco-friendly choices can feel overwhelming, but the Environmental Action team is here to guide you through it.

    Join our new Green Living newsletter to receive weekly tips on simple ways you can live a more sustainable lifestyle.

    To receive the next Green Living tip, subscribe today.

  • Tell your senators: Save elephants from trophy hunters

    One of the Trump administration's most heartbreaking environmental rollbacks was allowing the importation of dead endangered animals as trophies. Tell your U.S. senators: Elephants and other wildlife are treasures, not trophies; restore the importation ban.

  • Tell President Biden: Support critical protections for gray wolves

    Gray wolves are in danger of extinction -- especially since the Trump administration stripped them of Endangered Species Act protections. This means that states are now free to manage their wolf populations as they please, and some have already begun hunting and trapping season.

    President Biden can halt the slaughter by beginning the process of restoring endangered species protections for gray wolves. Send a message urging him to take action today.

  • Tell Coca-Cola: Help lead the way to a world free of plastic waste.

    Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey:

    Coca-Cola has been named the world's top plastic polluter for the third year running; Coca-Cola products accounted for more plastic waste than the next two biggest polluters combined.

    We can't simply recycle our way out of the plastic waste crisis. By committing to reducing its plastic use and replacing plastic with sustainable materials, Coca-Cola can be part of the solution and help us move closer to a world free from plastic waste.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell your representative to end fossil fuel subsidies

    Our federal government is using our taxes to fund the climate crisis. The U.S. gives the fossil fuel industry $20 billion in tax breaks, incentives and other subsidies every year.

    Tell your U.S. House representative: The federal government shouldn't fund an industry that's destroying our planet.

  • Tell your state representative: Help save monarch butterflies

    Monarch butterfly populations are collapsing, but the federal government has decided not to grant them protection under the Endangered Species Act -- even though they qualify. To save the monarchs, we need states to step up.

    Tell your state representative to protect vital monarch habitat by banning Roundup -- which kills the milkweed that monarchs need to survive.

  • Tell Congress: Restore the Endangered Species Act to its full strength

    We're in the midst of a worldwide extinction crisis, with more and more species losing their habitat to climate change and human activity -- and yet our best tool to protect vulnerable species, the Endangered Species Act (ESA), was gutted by the Trump administration. Tell your U.S. representative to restore the ESA to its full strength.

  • Tell your state senator: Ban Roundup

    The most widely used pesticide in the U.S. is a threat to endangered species. A report found that Roundup's main ingredient -- glyphosate -- is likely to harm 93 percent of endangered plants and animals.

    One endangered species that Roundup harms is the monarch butterfly -- an iconic creature that is rapidly disappearing. To help save this species -- and hundreds of others -- we need to ban glyphosate.

  • Support our state joining RGGI

    As a Pennsylvania resident and environmental activist, I fully support Pennsylvania joining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. RGGI is our nation's most successful initiative in fighting climate change. It's estimated that, by joining the program, our state could reduce its carbon emissions by 188 million tons by 2030. This will protect Pennsylvania's environment and public from the worst impacts of climate change.

  • Support neonic restrictions in New Jersey

    New Jersey is one step closer to taking bee-saving action. The state Senate and Assembly Appropriations Committee have passed legislation that would ban some of the worst uses of neonicotinoids, including non-agricultural use, the largest contributor to contamination. Now, it's time for the General Assembly to support this bill.

    Send a message to your state assemblyperson urging them to support a ban on the worst uses of neonicotinoids.

  • Tell the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Give whitebark pines the protection they need

    Docket: FWS-R6-ES-2019-0054

    I urge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list the whitebark pine tree as threatened, as proposed, and to also designate critical habitat to ensure that the species can recover. Whitebark pines play a vital role in high-elevation forest ecosystems and in the lives of other species that depend upon them. To avoid the devastating consequences of losing whitebark pines, we should implement the strongest protections possible.

  • Tell your governor to support bee habitat on state land

    Research finds that bees and other pollinators actually thrive in cities and towns when the right kinds of plants are allowed to grow in public gardens and parks. That's why we're calling on officials in states across the country, beginning with governors, to support initiatives to create safe havens for bees by growing bee-friendly, native plants on state-owned land.

  • Tell Whole Foods Market: Put our planet over plastic

    Dear CEO John Mackey,

    Our oceans -- and the whales, dolphins and sea turtles that live in them -- are choking on plastic trash. We need to turn off the tap on the 8 million metric tons of plastic pollution that enter the ocean each year, and you can play a leading role by eliminating single-use plastic packaging.

    Nothing that is used for just a couple of minutes should pollute our rivers and oceans for hundreds of years -- especially when we don't need it. If we're going to protect ocean ecosystems, we need companies to make bold, concrete commitments to reduce and ultimately eliminate single-use plastic packaging. I'm urging Whole Foods to be a leader once again. Please eliminate all single-use plastic packaging from your operations.

  • Tell the Trump administration: No seismic surveys in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Docket No. FWS-R7-ES-2020-0129

    FXES111607MRG01-212-FF07CAMM00

    I oppose seismic surveys in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, which will harm polar bears and lead to further environmental destruction by oil and gas companies.

    Seismic surveys are a terrifying threat to polar bears, who build dens in the ice of the coastal plain to give birth and nurse their young. The IHA proposal says that polar bears have a 21 percent chance of getting killed or injured during the surveys -- and this 1 in 5 threat of slaughtering an endangered species is far too high.

    The Arctic Refuge is one of the last wild places in the U.S., and it's home to the Porcupine caribou herd, migratory birds, and hundreds of other incredible species. We can't trade in this special place for a little more oil.

  • Stop Wyoming's wolf hunt

    Now that gray wolves no longer have nationwide federal protection, the actions of individual states are more important than ever. Wyoming needs to protect its wolves, not allow them to be slaughtered. Wyoming's annual wolf hunt, on top of the unlimited take permitted in 85 percent of the state, is simply unsustainable. I strongly urge you to end your state's annual trophy hunt.

  • Hold companies accountable for killing thousands of birds

    The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) has been the strongest protection for birds in America for over a century. It holds companies liable for harm done to birds as a result of oil and gas drilling, construction and infrastructure projects, and more. More than 1,000 species of birds depend on the MBTA for protection, and this law has saved species like the snowy egret from extinction.

    North America has lost more than 3 billion birds since 1970. We need to strengthen protection for birds, not remove consequences for companies that kill them by the thousands. I strongly urge you not to allow companies to "incidentally" kill birds without consequences.

  • Tell the Trump administration: Don't force banks to invest in environmental destruction

    Docket ID OCC-2020-0042

    I strongly oppose this proposed regulation. The "Fair Access to Financial Services" rule would force banks to finance an industry that is irreparably harming our planet.

    At a time when our country should be quickly transitioning to renewable energy sources, this rule will force banks to make poor investments in fossil fuel projects that contribute to environmental destruction and the climate crisis.

    According to a recent poll, most Americans -- 68 percent -- support the decision made by federal financial institutions to refrain from funding drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is a beautiful place that should be protected by the federal government -- and I applaud the banks' decision not to fund its destruction.

  • Tell America's governors to protect wolves

    The decision by the U.S. Department of the Interior to remove wolves from the federal endangered species list puts their still-vulnerable populations at risk. Until they are returned to the list, the task of protecting this threatened species will fall to the states. I urge you to adopt wolf-friendly management policies within your state and to help prevent the opening of any new hunting seasons.

  • Add Your Name: No Oil Drilling in the Arctic Refuge

    Docket #: 19X.LLAK930000.L13100000.EI0000.241A

    I strongly oppose the oil and gas lease sale on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge's 1.6 million-acre coastal plain. This call for nominations, which initiates oil and gas drilling in the coastal plain, threatens polar bears, caribou, migratory birds and other wildlife that call the refuge home. The intensive activity, noise and vibrations will disturb wildlife and disfigure the land they rely on, and there is no way to effectively eliminate these risks.

    The lease sale will also exacerbate climate change in an area that is already warming at twice the rate of the rest of the country. The effect of releasing further greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere will extend beyond the Arctic Refuge, impacting environmental quality and public health. To disregard these devastating impacts for a little more oil and gas would be a national tragedy.

  • Tell P&G: Use recycled paper in your tissue products

    One of the last truly wild places left on Earth, the beautiful Canadian boreal forest is home to caribou, lynx, wolves and more amazing creatures. But this forest is quickly disappearing -- partially due to clear-cutting trees to make tissue products for companies like Procter and Gamble.

    But P&G shareholders recently voted to ask the company to issue a report on deforestation and forest degradation in its supply chain, which is a huge step toward our goal to save the Canadian boreal.

    Send a message to P&G today to make sure that the company follows its shareholders' recommendation and uses recycled paper in its tissue products.

  • Tell Chevron: No oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is a safe haven for polar bears, caribou, wolves and millions of migratory birds -- to name just a few of the species that depend on it. It's one of the last places we should be drilling for oil and gas.

    Drilling would exact a tremendous cost on this beautiful wilderness and the wildlife that call it home. It would also be a risky and expensive proposition for your company.

    I'm calling on Chevron to pledge not to drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Tell Gov. Jay Inslee: Don't allow gray wolf killings in Washington

    Gray wolves are a beautiful species that is native to the U.S. -- but they're under threat across the country. In Washington, the Department of Fish and Wildlife authorizes gray wolf killings as a means of wildlife control. This practice is inhumane, and we have to stop it to save gray wolves in the state.

  • Tell Congress: Protect the greater sage-grouse

    The greater sage-grouse is in trouble. Its numbers have dropped from as high as 16 million to a few hundred thousand today.

    Yet, the U.S. House of Representatives is considering legislation that would prohibit the greater sage-grouse from being given Endangered Species Act protections. In order to protect this iconic bird, we need your help urging Congress to oppose this bill.

  • Tell the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife: Stop killing gray wolves

    The majestic gray wolf is a vulnerable species that is under attack across the U.S. -- especially in the state of Washington. The state has a long history of authorizing gray wolf killings, and state officials just authorized the killing of two wolves in the Leadpoint pack.

    It's simple: No one should be allowed to shoot vulnerable species. Tell the director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Service to stop authorizing wolf killings.

  • Tell NOAA: Issue the strongest rule possible to protect the North Atlantic right whale

    Due to human activity, there are only about 400 North Atlantic right whales left in existence, and these numbers are dwindling. If we don't act now, we may lose them forever.

    With the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) set to propose a rule to protect these sea creatures, join Environmental Action in calling on the agency to make it as strong as possible.

  • If we don't protect wolves, we could lose them forever

    Once, almost every single wolf in the Lower 48 states was shot to death. Under the protection of the Endangered Species Act, their population has slowly recovered.

    Right now, gray wolves only occupy 10 to 15 percent of their historical range. This critical species requires a national plan, if not a continental one, to make sure its numbers continue to rise.

    I urge you to keep gray wolves protected under the Endangered Species Act.

  • Tell the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Protect the rusty patched bumble bees' habitat

    The rusty patched bumble bee is dangerously close to extinction. In the last 20 years, the bees' population has declined by 87 percent. The bee once lived in grasslands and tall prairies in the Midwest and East Coast. Now, it's estimated that the bee only occupies 0.1 percent of its historic range. But the USFWS ruled that the endangered bee doesn't need habitat protections.

    Before it's too late, tell the USFWS to protect the rusty patched bumble bees' habitat to save it from extinction.

  • Take action to protect pollinators, people and our planet

    Honeybees and native bee populations are dying off at unsustainable rates, with important consequences for ecological stability and our global food supply. The use of toxic pesticides, including neonicotinoids, are largely responsible for this decline.

    A proposed bill in Congress would ban the use of neonicotinoids and chlorpyrifos, a toxic pesticide linked to brain development problems in children. Tell your senators to support the Protect America's Children from Toxic Pesticides Act of 2020 today.

  • Ban pesticides that cause brain damage in children and wildlife

    Chlorpyrifos is a pesticide that is used on crops like almonds, grapes and soybeans. Years of scientific studies prove that prenatal exposure to this pesticide can cause brain damage in children, and the pesticide also harms wildlife, especially honeybees.

    We need to ban chlorpyrifos, along with other dangerous pesticides. Tell your representative to support the Protect America's Children from Toxic Pesticides Act today.

  • Tell your senators: Support the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act

    Plastic waste is clogging our landfills, flooding oceans and harming marine life. In order to protect our planet from our own waste, we have to force companies to stop producing this harmful material. Ask your senators to hold companies responsible for cleaning up the plastic waste that they produce by passing the Break Free From Plastic Pollution Act.

  • Sign the petition: No fracked gas plant on the Delaware River

    I urge you not to approve the proposed liquefied gas plant in Gibbstown along the Delaware River. The facility will pose a risk to local communities and wildlife, transporting gas to the plant for processing will be dirty and dangerous, and the project will only increase demand for fossil fuels that are destructive to extract and exacerbate the climate crisis.

    I call on the Delaware River Basin Commission to oppose this project.

    Sincerely,

  • Ask your senators to save the Endangered Species Act

    A recent move to weaken the Endangered Species Act threatens vulnerable animals across the country. The proposed ESA updates could have disastrous effects on dwindling wildlife populations -- but it's not too late to voice your concern. Protect our wildlife by telling your senators to oppose these updates.

  • Stop timber sales in Tongass National Forest

    The proposal to allow timber sales in the Tongass National Forest would mean the clear-cutting of more than 5,000 acres of old-growth forest. These trees are hundreds of years old, home to the largest concentration of nesting bald eagles and the largest population of black bears. They also serve as a carbon sink and are vital to mitigating climate change.

    I urge you to adopt the No Action Alternative to protect the Tongass and all of the wildlife that call the forest home.

  • Submit a public comment to oppose weakening the Endangered Species Act

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's proposal to change how critical habitats are designated under the Endangered Species Act will hurt vulnerable animals. The proposal to allow the USFWS to exclude federal land from critical habitat designation will mean that endangered species lose out on the resources that they need to thrive. Additionally, the emphasis on weighing costs of community projects will make it easier to destroy animal habitats for financial incentives.

    I urge you to reject these proposed updates to the Endangered Species Act.

  • Ask your senators to protect our environment from methane leaks

    A new Trump administration rule freed oil and gas companies to carelessly leak methane, a greenhouse gas that is at least 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide, into our atmosphere. The rule allows oil and gas companies to leave broken equipment unfixed, which will lead to an increase in methane emissions. Now is the time to cut greenhouse gas emissions, and this rule is a step backward for our climate.

    Gas and oil companies should be responsible for preventing toxic messes. Tell your senators to protect our planet today.

  • Ban offshore drilling permanently

    Oil spills are detrimental to coastal ecosystems and especially wildlife. Young sea turtles can become trapped in oil and even mistake it for food. Whales and dolphins can inhale oil, harming their lungs, reproduction and immune function. For seabirds, oil can coat their feathers, ruining the water repellency and exposing them to harsh elements.

    The only way to stop oil spills is to stop offshore drilling. Tell your senators to support a permanent ban on offshore drilling.

  • Protect California's pollinators from dangerous pesticides

    Dear California Department of Pesticide Regulation,

    I appreciate the CDPR's proposal to limit the dangers of neonicotinoid pesticides to pollinators. These protections are an important step toward saving the bees. However, CDPR must go further to safeguard biodiversity. We urge the CDPR to:

    1) Ban the consumer sale of neonicotinoids. Private citizens aren't typically aware of the impacts of neonicotinoids, and consequently over-apply the pesticides.

    2) Ban the pre-treatment of seeds with neonicotinoids. Neonic coatings dissipate into soil and water, accumulating in our environment and posing a continual threat to nesting and foraging pollinators.

    Thank you for your efforts to protect bees, but I urge you to implement these additional measures to reduce the harms from neonicotinoids.

    Sincerely,

  • Help end the use of toxic pesticides in national wildlife refuges

    National wildlife refuges should be safe havens for bees, but the Trump administration reversed a ban on toxic neonicotinoids in wildlife refuges.

    In order to ensure our most wild places remain true refuges for bees and other pollinators, it's time to reinstate the ban. Join thousands of supporters like you in calling on your representative to support an end to the use of neonicotinoids on our national wildlife refuges.

  • Protect our oceans and the creatures that call them home from plastic

    Researchers have found 10 times as much plastic in the Atlantic Ocean than previously estimated.

    Polystyrene, commonly known as Styrofoam, is one of the worst forms of plastic pollution as it is easily blown from landfills into our environment, making its way into our lakes and streams, and eventually our oceans, while breaking into smaller and smaller pieces -- but never fully degrading.

    Tell your state legislators: Support a ban on polystyrene foam cups and containers.

  • Tell your representative: Stand up for polar bear cubs

    The Trump administration has moved to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling. The refuge also happens to be the most densely populated area of denning mother polar bears and their cubs.

    The activities and equipment from drilling could cause mother polar bears to abandon their dens and cubs, or even cause injury or death to the bears in dens.

    The Polar Bear Cub Survival Act will stop that from happening. Tell your U.S. representative to support the act today.

  • Tell Congress: Pass the ANTIQUITIES Act

    The ANTIQUITIES Act (S.367/H.R.1050) would protect Papahānaumokuākea and other national monuments from attacks by ensuring that only Congress will have the authority to modify an existing national monument. Tell Congress to pass the ANTIQUITIES Act.

  • Tell the Department of Interior to reverse Alaskan oil plan

    The Trump administration is planning to open up 18.7 million acres of Alaska's North Slope to oil and gas development, a huge step backward in our fight for clean energy.

    This plan could lead to the release of up to 51 million metric tons of carbon dioxide into our atmosphere. It would also allow for drilling development near the ecologically important Teshekpuk Lake, home to herds of caribou, denning polar bears, and endangered birds.

    Tell the Trump administration: Stop expanding oil and gas development and protect Alaska's wildlife.

  • Tell Secretary Bernhardt: Support grizzly bear recovery in the North Cascades

    For thousands of years, grizzly bears roamed the North Cascades. Now, fewer than 10 remain. In order to avoid permanent loss of grizzly bears in the North Cascades, join us in calling on Secretary Bernhardt to support reintroduction.

  • Tell the USFWS: Don't reduce critical habitat for endangered species

    Docket # FWS-HQ-ES-2020-0047

    I oppose the proposed rule to redefine “habitat” as “areas with existing attributes that have the capacity to support individuals of the species.” This change would preclude restoration of endangered species’ historical habitat, and further threaten our most vulnerable wildlife.

    The Endangered Species Act is intended to protect wildlife from extinction. But this proposal would weaken those protections. As such, I urge you to abandon this proposal.

    Sincerely,

  • A bill to protect ocean wildlife from plastic

    The Plastic Pollution Reduction Act is one of the most ambitious pieces of plastics legislation in the country. It will set state targets to reduce single-use plastic and packaging waste by 75 percent by 2032.

    This bill will help protect sea turtles, whales, and other ocean wildlife from the threat of plastic pollution -- but your state legislators need to hear from you.

  • Tell your governor: Ban the use of sulfoxaflor pesticides

    A new study finds that sulfoxaflor pesticides are contributing to global die-offs of bumblebees. And this is just the latest research showing that sulfoxaflor is toxic to wild bees, honeybees and other pollinators.

    Join Environmental Action today in standing up for bees by calling on your governor to ban the use of sulfoxaflor.

  • Take action to stop this coal mine

    The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) recently authorized the construction of the state's first brand new coal mine in decades. But more dirty, dangerous coal is the last thing we need at a time when climate change is growing out of control and renewable energy is more accessible than ever.

    Send a message to the Wyoming DEQ and urge them to revoke the permit for this dirty, dangerous new coal mine.

  • Save brown bears from cruel hunting

    Docket Number: FWS-R7-NWRS-2017-0058

    Brown bears are some of the most magnificent animals that call America home, and the bears of the Kenai Peninsula are a unique population worth protecting. The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge should be a safe place for bears to thrive -- not be lured to their deaths by human food. I strongly urge you not to amend your refuge-specific regulations on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge to allow the harvest of brown bears over bait.

  • Take action to save bees from toxic pesticides

    One of the leading causes for mass bee die-offs is the widespread use of bee-killing pesticides called neonicotinoids. Neonicotinoids poison bees, resulting in neurological damage, paralysis and death.

    Join our campaign to save the bees by calling on your state representative and senator to ban the worst uses of neonicotinoids.

  • Tell your senators to support the SAVE Right Whales Act

    Right whale populations are already dwindling, and scientists have found the surviving individuals to be "disturbingly thin" as warming sea temperatures drive away their main food source. On top of that, dozens of right whales are being killed by fishing line entanglement and ship strikes.

    The SAVE Right Whales Act would allocate $5 million every year to North Atlantic right whale conservation programs.

    Tell your senators to support the SAVE Right Whales Act today.

  • Stop this 15-year-long oil leak

    The Taylor Energy oil spill has been leaking as much as 4,500 gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico every single day since 2004 -- but the company is trying hard to avoid liability for the disaster, even though it was ordered by the federal government to take responsibility for the cleanup. This long-running oil leak is poisoning the Gulf of Mexico, and we need to stop it before it can do any more damage.

    Tell the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to protect the Gulf by enforcing the federal order to stop the leak.

  • Fragile corals, endangered whales and more need your protection

    The Trump administration reauthorized commercial fishing in a fragile, beautiful Atlantic Ocean sanctuary: The Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument.

    Our protected ocean areas are no place for environmentally destructive fishing. Call on your U.S. elected officials to oppose the recent rollbacks to the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument.

  • Monarchs need protection

    Dear USFWS Director Aurelia Skipwith,

    Monarch butterfly overwintering populations have plummeted to less than 1 percent of their numbers in 1980. There's no time to waste: To protect one of nature's most incredible creatures, we need to extend Endangered Species Act protections to monarchs now.

    I urge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect these beautiful nomads by listing them as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

    Sincerely,

  • Procter & Gamble: Stop using virgin boreal forest wood fiber to make toilet paper

    Dear CEO David Taylor,

    Canada's boreal forest acts as the lungs of the Northern Hemisphere -- removing enough carbon dioxide yearly to offset the emissions of 24 million cars. Lynx, forest caribou and billions of migratory birds make this place their home. This vast and pristine forest's value truly cannot be overstated.

    Yet the boreal is vanishing at a rate of 1 million acres of trees every year, destroying habitat for untold wildlife and fueling climate change by releasing stored carbon. Some of this deforestation is to create the virgin wood pulp used to make your household tissue products -- which Americans are now buying more of than ever.

    At last year's shareholder meeting, you heard from the environmental community loud and clear: You can help protect the boreal forest by using recycled paper in your Charmin, Bounty and other tissue brands. As a consumer of tissue products, I, too, am calling on you to make this commitment.

    Sincerely,

  • Save the Southern Resident orcas

    Dear Sens. Cantwell and Murray,

    An 8,000-page assessment of the environmental impacts of dams and reservoirs in the Columbia River basin was just released. Almost entirely absent from that report: mentions of the Southern Resident orca, and how the Lower Snake River dams affect their food source.

    Southern Resident orcas are starving. Fewer than 80 remain in the wild today. To save them, we know we need to save their supply of Chinook salmon.

    But since the construction of the Lower Snake River dams, the salmon population has dropped alarmingly. I urge you to bring breaching these dams to Congress in order to restore the salmon population that these orcas need to survive and thrive.

  • Tell your representative: Listen to the people, protect the Tongass

    Alaska's Tongass National Forest is beloved for its unmatched wildness. A rare population of wolves and the world's largest concentrations of black bears, brown bears and nesting bald eagles are just a few slivers of the sprawling, diverse web of life that lives among the Tongass' sea of centuries-old trees.

    That's why the public overwhelmingly opposes the Trump administration's plan to open up vast swathes of the Tongass to mining, development and clear-cut logging. But with the Trump administration and state officials still in favor of the plan, Congress needs to step in. Tell your representative: Pass the Roadless Area Conservation Act to protect the Tongass and millions of acres in other priceless national forests.

  • Take action to save birds

    Birds of all kinds -- so critical to ecosystems everywhere -- are being wiped out: North America's bird population has dropped by nearly a third since 1970.

    There's a lot we need to do to turn things around for birds, but a great place to start is reducing building collisions. These are a major cause of bird death, killing up to a billion birds each year.

    A bill called the Bird-Safe Buildings Act would make collisions with public buildings far less likely. Tell your representative to support it today.

  • Stop wolf killing in Washington state

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has officially authorized the killing of two more endangered wolves. Tell the director of WDFW that wolf killing is not the right way to manage this endangered species.

  • Save gray wolves from hunting

    There's not a moment to lose -- the Trump administration could announce its decision to officially end Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection for wolves at any minute. We need to speak out for wolves right now to ensure these amazing animals will be safe to thrive in America for generations to come.

  • Stop plans to drill on the doorstep of Arches and Canyonlands

    As Americans are preoccupied by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration is signing away even more of our public lands for dirty, destructive oil and gas drilling.

    Among the lands that could soon be home to polluting pipelines and oil rigs? More than 110,000 acres on the doorstep of two of America's best-known, most beloved national parks: Arches and its nearby cousin, Canyonlands.

    Tell the Trump administration: Oil and gas development doesn't belong anywhere near two wild places so iconic and special.

  • Tell your governor: No new drilling

    Even as large portions of our country and daily life remain shut down, state governments are still moving ahead on approving new oil and gas projects, like fracking and drilling operations.

    In the long term, we know that we can't continue to pull climate change-causing fuel from the ground in a process that wrecks habitats and disturbs wildlife, while clean, renewable energy options exist.

    But right now, while the novel coronavirus prevents agencies from holding hearings on permitting, the public isn't getting its chance to have a full say on projects that are harmful to nature and its creatures.

    Tell your governor to place a moratorium on new oil and gas drilling and fracking leases.

  • Tell the Trump administration: No hunting wolf pups in their dens

    Thanks to a new Trump administration rule, wolf pups sleeping with their parents in their dens can now be shot by hunters in Alaska -- completely legally. This outrageously cruel rule can't be allowed to stand. Send a message opposing this rule change to the Trump administration today.

  • Tell Cargill to end its role in tropical deforestation and save the jaguar's home.

    Cargill CEO David W. MacLennan,

    Deforestation is on the rise in areas of Brazil that jaguars call home -- and where Cargill sources commodities like soy, which has been linked to deforestation.

    Jaguars are on the decline. To save them and other threatened species, we must protect their home -- the world's tropical forests.

    I urge you to strengthen Cargill's commitment to eliminate deforestation in all of its supply chains by 2023.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Cargill to end its role in tropical deforestation and save the jaguar's home.

    Cargill CEO David W. MacLennan,

    Deforestation is on the rise in areas of Brazil that jaguars call home -- and where Cargill sources commodities like soy, which has been linked to deforestation.

    Jaguars are on the decline. To save them and other threatened species, we must protect their home -- the world's tropical forests.

    I urge you to strengthen Cargill's commitment to eliminate deforestation in all of its supply chains by 2023.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell Cargill to end its role in tropical deforestation and save the jaguar's home.

    Cargill CEO David W. MacLennan,

    Deforestation is on the rise in areas of Brazil that jaguars call home -- and where Cargill sources commodities like soy, which has been linked to deforestation.

    Jaguars are on the decline. To save them and other threatened species, we must protect their home -- the world's tropical forests.

    I urge you to strengthen Cargill's commitment to eliminate deforestation in all of its supply chains by 2023.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Trump administration: Stop offshore lease sales during the COVID-19 crisis

    10 years ago, the Deepwater Horizon disaster devastated the Gulf of Mexico. Today, we're still leasing sections of the Gulf to oil and gas companies for offshore drilling -- in fact, Trump's Department of the Interior just sold hundreds of thousands of acres, while people were distracted by the COVID-19 crisis.

    We can't afford to risk devastating the Gulf of Mexico again -- especially not while the public is preoccupied with a public health crisis. Tell the Interior Department: Place a moratorium on new offshore drilling lease sales.

  • Tell the Army Corps of Engineers: Save Bristol Bay

    Alaska's Bristol Bay is a unique ecological treasure, whose massive annual salmon run -- one of the world's largest -- supports creatures of all shapes and sizes.

    It's a place uniquely ill-suited to a proposed open-pit mine that would be North America's largest. The mine's pits would clog and dewater the streams, rivers and wetlands in which the salmon spawn; its toxic runoff would poison the bay, and with it, not just the fish but also the animals that rely on them.

    For 10 years, local advocates have staunchly opposed Pebble Mine. Tell the Army Corps of Engineers, which will make a final decision on this project, to listen to them and reject this destructive mine.

  • Mexican gray wolves need strong protection

    Mexican gray wolves, or lobos, are an amazing and vital part of the ecosystems of the American Southwest. Their ongoing recovery is remarkable -- but incomplete. Lobos need strong protection if they are going to continue to survive. I strongly urge you to craft a management plan for lobos that maximizes opportunities to grow the wild population, expands the habitat available to them, and prevents the hunting and trapping of these vulnerable animals.

  • Tell the FWS: Protect the Alexander Archipelago wolf

    Up to 97 percent of the Alexander Archipelago wolves on Prince of Wales Island were killed during this past trapping season. This tragedy is unsustainable.

    Send a message to Drew Crane, the Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Endangered Species Coordinator for Alaska, urging him to protect these incredibly rare wolves before they're gone forever.

  • Support strong protections for lynx

    With their tufted ears and bobbed tail, lynx are some of the most unique animals that call America home -- but we may be on the brink of losing them. Because lynx populations are in decline across the American West, I strongly support continued protection for these amazing wildcats.

  • A second chance to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline

    In a victory for wildlife and clean water, a judge has just struck down permits for the Dakota Access Pipeline.

    Let's make sure this project never puts wildlife like wolves, butterflies and fish, and the drinking water source for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, at risk of being poisoned by a crude oil spill. Tell the Army Corps of Engineers: Don't grant new permits to the Dakota Access Pipeline.

  • Dangerous explosives shouldn't be shipped through our neighborhoods

    Liquefied natural gas is too volatile and dangerous to be shipped by rail through our communities. We need to fuel our lives with renewable energy -- not dirty, dangerous fossil fuels. I strongly oppose this proposal to authorize the transportation of liquefied natural gas across America by rail.

  • Stop a mine from destroying Minnesota's Boundary Waters

    The Boundary Waters wilderness is beloved: Its rich wildlife and beautiful lakes make it the most-visited wilderness area in the country.

    But a company with a disastrous track record wants to mine on the doorstep of the Boundary Waters. That would pose an existential threat to the wilderness' delicate ecosystem.

    Now, though, we have a chance to protect the Boundary Waters forever. Tell your U.S. representative to support a new bill blocking polluting mining projects near the Boundary Waters.

  • Stop wildlife trafficking, save lives

    At least three-quarters of emerging infectious diseases -- including COVID-19 -- are believed to have originated in animals and jumped to human populations. Putting an end to wildlife trafficking would help save some of the planet's most endangered animals -- and help protect human populations from the threat of newly emerging diseases.

    Send a message to your U.S. representative in support of the PAW Against Trafficking Act, which will help America reduce its role in the international wildlife trade.

  • Bank of America: Don't finance destructive drilling in the Arctic Refuge

    Fossil fuel extraction poses a massive threat to one of America's last pristine wild places: the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Plans to drill in this ecologically sensitive haven are so irresponsible that three of America's biggest banks -- JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and Wells Fargo -- have already agreed not to finance projects in the refuge.

    Bank of America, the second-largest bank in the country, must join them if it wants to prove its commitment to sustainability.

    Wildlife in the Arctic Refuge flourish because it's a place largely untouched by industry. Millions of migratory birds, families of polar bears and the 200,000-strong Porcupine caribou herd would be severely threatened by the intrusion of heavy industry that drilling plans would bring. An intact Arctic Refuge is also critical to the livelihood and culture of the local Gwich'in people.

    I urge Bank of America to follow in the steps of other major financial institutions and refuse to finance drilling in the Arctic Refuge.

  • Tell Congress: No more get-out-of-jail-free cards for bird killers

    The Trump administration has loosened its enforcement of the Migratory Birds Treaty Act, letting companies get away with "accidentally" killing countless birds. Here's how you can support a bipartisan proposal to stop the killing.

  • Stop expanded oil and gas drilling near Chaco Canyon

    New Mexico's Chaco Culture National Historical Park is an International Dark Sky Park -- beloved by stargazers for its pristine dark skies full of constellations. It's a sanctuary for elk, bobcats, badgers, bats, lizards and other desert wildlife that thrive in the dark and away from development.

    But just outside its boundaries, oil and gas development has already taken a toll on the area, lighting up once-dark night skies and releasing vast plumes of methane, among other types of air pollution.

    I oppose plans to expand drilling closer to Chaco Canyon, and urge the Bureau of Land Management to adopt a moratorium on oil and gas leasing on federal land within 10 miles of the park.

  • Tell Congress: no money for dirty uranium mines

    Uranium mining is an ecological disaster. Its waste contaminates waterways and aquifers and sickens wildlife and people nearby. We shouldn't be opening more of these mines -- especially anywhere close to the Grand Canyon.

    Yet the Trump administration wants to go ahead with a $1.5 billion bailout of flagging uranium mining companies in the U.S. At least one has indicated it could use the money to mine near the Canyon's rim.

    Tell your representative to say no to a giveaway to polluters that could do serious harm to wildlife and wild places.

  • Tell Nestlé: Don't drain Ginnie Springs for bottled water

    I strongly urge you to abandon proposed plans to draw as much as 1.1 million gallons of water a day from Ginnie Springs. With the water levels already low, further pumping would threaten both the health of the spring and the wildlife that call it home. It would be a tragedy to sacrifice Ginnie Springs' ecological diversity and natural beauty for bottled water.

    Sincerely,

  • Help save the monarch migration

    Since 1980, we've seen a heartbreaking drop in the number of monarch butterflies making their way south to their overwintering grounds each year. Plenty of factors have contributed to their decline, but it's clear that one of the key threats monarchs face is glyphosate, the active ingredient in the weed killer Roundup.

    We spray Roundup by the millions of pounds, and it annihilates milkweed, the plant that monarch butterflies rely on to survive.

    Tell your governor to ban Roundup to help save one of the natural world's greatest migrations.

  • Take action against strip mining our protected mountaintops

    We shouldn't be tearing up mountaintops to produce energy. Make your voice heard to protect the Cumberland Plateau from destructive strip mining.

  • Help save the monarch migration

    Since 1980, we've seen a heartbreaking drop in the number of monarch butterflies making their way south to their overwintering grounds each year. Plenty of factors have contributed to their decline, but it's clear that one of the key threats monarchs face is glyphosate, the active ingredient in the weed killer Roundup.

    We spray Roundup by the millions of pounds, and it annihilates milkweed, the plant that monarch butterflies rely on to survive.

    Tell your governor to ban Roundup to help save one of the natural world's greatest migrations.

  • Tell McDonald's: Hold The Plastic Toys, Please.

    Plastic toys in your Happy Meals give children a few minutes of pleasure, but spoil the environment for hundreds of years. Please send a message to our nation's children that their health and environment matter most, by rapidly phasing out the giveaway of plastic toys in your Happy Meals.

  • Protect the giant manta ray from extinction

    Giant manta rays have been driven to the verge of extinction. The White House has the power to use the Endangered Species Act to save these magnificent creatures. Please encourage the Administration to act to protect the giant manta ray.

  • Give oceanic whitetip sharks a chance

    Oceanic whitetip sharks -- the apex predator of the ocean -- are being driven to the verge of extinction. The White House has the power to save these magnificent creatures and the ocean ecosystems for which they are so important. Please encourage the Trump administration to act today to save the sharks.

  • No Wolf-Free Zones in Idaho

    Idaho lawmakers want to make parts of the state into permanent "wolf-free zones" where an unlimited number of wolves can be killed -- even when mothers are in dens with their pups.

    Our nation's wonderful, wild wolves deserve to thrive, not face unlimited hunting. Send a message to Idaho's governor and urge him to say "no" to wolf-free zones in his state.

  • Tell your U.S. senators: Don't put wolves on the chopping block

    Sen. Mike Lee (Utah) has introduced legislation that would erase Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves. That would mean more hunting and more trapping of gray wolves across the country.

    We need to stop this bill -- wolves are counting on us. We're gearing up to make sure that we have the resources we need to protect wolves across America in the year ahead.

    Tell your U.S. senators: Threatened and endangered animals deserve our protection -- not to be hunted and trapped for sport.

  • Take action to stop dirty, dangerous fracking

    Citing economic instability amid the coronavirus outbreak, the Trump administration is planning to give fracking companies a massive bailout.

    More dirty, dangerous fracking is the last thing we need. Call on your elected officials to do everything they can to block this bailout.

  • Thank Gov. Hogan for protecting bees

    Our Beeport Card gave Maryland an A in bee conservation for its work to expand pollinator-friendly habitat and restrict the use of bee-killing pesticides. Thank your governor for supporting these policies and giving bees a chance.

  • Call on your governor to stand up for bees

    Our states should be accountable for protecting bees from persistent threats. Urge your governor to take action by banning neonicotinoids, a class of highly toxic pesticides.

  • Tell the EPA: Ban the worst uses of neonicotinoids

    A growing body of evidence concludes that neonicotinoids -- including acetamiprid, clothianidinare, dinotefuran, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam -- are a leading cause of colony collapse disorder. Bees should be protected from -- not poisoned by -- toxic pesticides. The EPA must act to ban the most common and problematic uses of neonicotinoids, including the use of treated seeds and the consumer sale of these pesticides.

    Dockets:
    # EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0329
    # EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0865
    # EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0920
    # EPA-HQ-OPP-2008-0844
    # EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0581

  • Call on your governor to stand up for bees

    Our states should be accountable for protecting bees from persistent threats. Urge your governor to take action by banning neonicotinoids, a class of highly toxic pesticides.

  • Don't miss out on your copy of the Beeport Card

    How does your state rank on bee conservation?

    Add your name, and you'll be among the first to find out! We'll be sending an email out shortly to all signers with an exclusive link to our Beeport Card.

  • Don't miss out on your copy of the Beeport Card

    How does your state rank on bee conservation?

    Add your name, and you'll be among the first to find out! We'll be sending an email out shortly to all signers with an exclusive link to our Beeport Card.

  • Protect birds by strongly enforcing the Migratory Birds Treaty Act

    For decades, administrations of both parties held companies and people accountable for "accidental," but avoidable deaths of birds for which they were responsible. The penalties they issued saved millions of birds by encouraging companies to take preventative actions.

    If enacted, the proposed "Regulations Governing Take of Migratory Birds" would radically change that practice. By giving legitimacy to an often-specious alibi -- that "we didn't intend to kill the birds" -- electric power companies will no longer feel a financial need to prevent birds from being electrocuted on their transmission wires. The fishing industry will be encouraged to cut corners on their bird-ensnaring nets. And the oil industry will have an incentive to stop covering the waste pits in which birds drown.

    I urge you to save the lives of millions of birds each year by withdrawing this regulation and returning to the historic, bipartisan practice of enforcing the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

  • Protect African elephants: Stop importing trophies

    Elephant populations are more fragile than ever. We need to work to preserve elephants, not hunt them for sport. Tell Congress to support the CECIL Act today.

  • Tell your governor: Make your state monarch-friendly

    Monarch butterflies are getting hit hard -- by habitat loss, climate change and herbicides like glyphosate.

    One simple thing we can do to help them recover: Make sure they have the plants they need to survive. States can create safe havens for monarchs on their public lands by planting native milkweed that the butterflies need to raise their young, as well as the native nectars that adults feed on.

    Call on your governor to make your state monarch-friendly by planting native milkweed and nectar plants on our public lands.

  • No drilling in these wildlife lifelines

    Wildlife corridors help wildlife thrive by connecting fragmented habitats. But the Bureau of Land Management is leasing out vast swaths of protected wildlife corridor land to oil and gas companies for drilling.

    I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats because, without them, we'd lose a powerful and proven conservation tool that wildlife need now more than ever.

  • Take action to protect Bears Ears, Grand Staircase-Escalante

    The Trump administration finalized plans to expand drilling and mining in Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante. It would be a tragedy to sacrifice these national monuments' natural beauty and ecological diversity for a little more oil, gas and uranium. Tell President Trump to halt his plans for development that could devastate these special places.

  • Save wildlife: Ban single-use plastic foam

    Microplastics are being eaten by belugas in the remote Arctic -- another reminder that plastic pollution is out of control.

    It's time to take serious action to reduce waste, starting with a ban on one of the worst forms of plastic waste: plastic foam.

    Tell your governor to ban single-use plastic foam cups and containers today.

  • You can help stop thousands of bird deaths

    For over a century, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act has protected thousands of birds from horrific deaths due to oil pits, power lines and other industrial hazards. The Trump administration's rollback of this vital legislation will give a free pass to oil companies and others to kill birds without repercussions. I strongly oppose this rollback and support a strong Migratory Bird Treaty Act that prohibits incidental take.

  • Take action to stop environmentally destructive rollbacks

    Docket Number: CEQ-2019-0003

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) has been a cornerstone of environmental protection in America for 50 years. I strongly oppose any changes to NEPA that will allow federal agencies to ignore climate change or hasten harmful development. It's already too easy to build carbon-intensive and ecologically destructive infrastructure, and this rollback would make it even easier.

  • Tell Cargill to end its role in tropical deforestation and save the jaguar's home.

    Cargill CEO David W. MacLennan,

    Deforestation is on the rise in areas of Brazil that jaguars call home -- and where Cargill sources commodities like soy, which has been linked to deforestation.

    Jaguars are on the decline. To save them and other threatened species, we must protect their home -- the world's tropical forests.

    I urge you to strengthen Cargill's commitment to eliminate deforestation in all of its supply chains soon.

    Sincerely,

  • Submit your comment: Protect America's barrier reef

    Docket Number: NOAA-NOS-2019-0094

    The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary is an irreplaceable resource: 170 miles of coral, seagrass and mangroves that support an incredible range of wild creatures. Its beauty draws millions to the Keys each year.

    Creating a plan to update protections for the sanctuary is the right choice. Between runoff, plastic pollution, increased boat traffic and climate change, the continental U.S.'s biggest reef faces more threats than ever. If it collapses, we'll lose many of the species that call it home forever.

    For the sake of future generations, and for the wildlife that call the sanctuary home, I support the strongest of the restoration blueprint's proposed protections.

  • Thank North Carolina's governor for standing up for red wolves

    North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper is advocating to the Interior Department in favor of protection for his state's critically endangered wild red wolves. Send a message of thanks to Gov. Cooper for standing between these amazing wolves and extinction.

  • Keep a dangerous mine out of Minnesota's Boundary Waters

    Putting a mine in the Boundary Waters wilderness would spell doom for this uniquely delicate ecosystem.

    It's the wrong mine in the wrong place, and anyone who cares about wild spaces needs to speak out against the Trump administration's efforts to push it through. Tell your senators to protect the Boundary Waters.

  • Tell your governor: Protect our waters from coal ash spills

    Obama-era rules, slated to go into effect in 2018, would have regulated coal ash waste from power plants -- which is leaching toxic heavy metals into our lakes and rivers. But the Trump administration's EPA just made it clear that it won't enact these rules.

    In order to protect wildlife and public health, our governors should pass their own laws regulating coal ash. Tell your governor to take action today.

  • Call on your governor to plant trees for the planet

    Planting trees on public lands is a simple step that can make a big difference. Ask your governor to act on climate change by investing in trees.

  • Save the Endangered Species Act

    It's the 2020s: Time to turn the tide for the wild creatures we love. The first step? Repair the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

    The ESA has been one of America's bedrock conservation laws for more than 40 years. But the Trump administration severely weakened its authority in 2018, opening up the possibility that millions of creatures could lose the Act's protections.

    A bill has been introduced in the Senate to reverse the administration's rollbacks. Tell your senator to support it today.

  • Tell your senators: Vote to save right whales

    Ship strikes, fishing line entanglement and other threats are killing so many right whales each year that we could lose this creature forever if we don't act soon.

    The U.S. Senate is considering a bill that would direct desperately needed funds to research efforts that could reduce right whale death. It's got a good chance of passing -- but we need public support if we're going to get decision-makers to take action.

    Send a message to your senators today.

  • Don't let Nestlé drain Ginnie Springs

    Nestlé's permit request to draw as much as 1.1 million gallons of water a day from Ginnie Springs threatens the area's natural beauty and ecological diversity. Years of over-pumping have already scarred this spring and the Sante Fe River, which has seen a precipitous drop in water level and stalled river flow.

    I strongly urge you to deny this application.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell your U.S. senators: Don't put wolves on the chopping block

    Sen. Mike Lee (Utah) has introduced legislation that would erase Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves. That would mean more hunting and more trapping of gray wolves across the country.

    We need to stop this bill -- wolves are counting on us. We're gearing up to make sure that we have the resources we need to protect wolves across America in the year ahead.

    Tell your U.S. senators: Threatened and endangered animals deserve our protection -- not to be hunted and trapped for sport.

  • Stop Wyoming's Wolf Hunts

    As nature-loving people who treasure Wyoming's amazing natural beauty and abundant wildlife, we, the undersigned, call on you to end wolf hunting in the state. Wolves aren't just important icons of the American West: They are vital to the health of the ecosystems they call home.

    We do not believe that Wyoming's current management plan accounts for wolves' important ecological benefits. The state's current management plan also does not provide sufficient assurances that wolves will not be hunted past the point of viability. For all these reasons -- and because we want our travel, tourism, and tax dollars to support gray wolves -- we urge you to end wolf hunting in the state of Wyoming.

    Sincerely,

  • Deadline Dec. 16: Stand up for the Tongass

    We only have until Dec. 16 to comment on a proposal that would allow logging into our nation's largest, wildest national forest. Send a message to the Forest Service today.

  • We can't let wild red wolves vanish

    Interior Secretary David Bernhardt,

    With as few as 14 individuals left, it's now or never for our nation's wild red wolves. It's the Fish and Wildlife Service's responsibility to steward this fragile population, but that bureau has failed to provide clarity about the measures it is taking -- if any -- to ensure red wolves' survival.

    I strongly urge you to hold the FWS accountable and require it to produce an update about the status of the last wild red wolves. You must ensure that effective management activities are underway. These incredible animals could be faced with extinction if we don't protect them right now.

    Sincerely,

  • Save Southern Resident orcas

    Dear Gov. Jay Inslee,

    Southern Resident orcas evoke the Pacific Northwest like few creatures can. Their loss would be devastating, and due in part to threats to Chinook salmon -- their main food supply -- that loss could be close at hand.

    You showed care and foresight when you convened a task force charged with reversing the southern residents' decline. Now that task force has made their final recommendations. I'm calling on you to act on one of the task force's chief action items: Fully fund salmon recovery efforts to ensure that Chinook populations are healthy and steady.

    I know you care about these special creatures just as much as I do. Let's work together to protect them for good.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the U.S. House of Representatives: Protect the Appalachian Trail

    Ask your representative to oppose construction of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline through the Appalachian Trail.

  • Tell your senators: Support the Bird-Safe Buildings Act

    A new study has found that bird populations have nosedived over the past 40 years; since 1970, a third of all of North America's birds have died.

    One of the main culprits? Building collisions. Birds are colliding with glass they can't see and dying by the billions each year.

    The Bird-Safe Buildings Act is a common sense step that would significantly reduce bird collisions with public buildings. Tell your senators to support it.

  • Tell Amazon to promote green shipping

    Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos:

    As one of the largest online retailers in the U.S., it's important for Amazon to take the lead in establishing practices that are better for our planet.

    When your customers choose two-day shipping, that means tighter deadlines, which means half-full trucks, more trips and less efficiency -- and that results in a lot more carbon emissions.

    There is one simple step you can take for our planet that would have a huge impact: Alert customers that standard shipping is greener by adding "Go Green" before that option. By nudging shoppers towards choosing standard, you can help reduce emissions that contribute to climate change.

    It's almost the holiday season -- I urge you to make this simple but profound change before millions of Americans start buying their gifts.

  • Tell President Trump: Recommit to the Paris Climate Agreement

    President Trump has begun the formal withdrawal from the landmark agreement to address climate change. Call on his administration to recommit to the goals outlined in the Paris Climate Agreement in order to protect our planet from the impacts of global warming.

  • Tell P&G: Stop using virgin boreal forest wood fiber to make toilet paper

    Dear CEO David Taylor,

    Canada's boreal forest acts as the lungs of the Northern Hemisphere -- removing enough carbon dioxide yearly to offset the emissions of 24 million cars. Lynx, forest caribou and billions of migratory birds make this place their home. This pristine forest's value truly cannot be overstated.

    Yet the boreal is vanishing at a rate of 1 million acres of trees every year, destroying habitat for untold wildlife and fueling climate change by releasing stored carbon. Some of this deforestation is to create the virgin wood pulp used to make your household tissue products.

    At your 2019 shareholder meeting, you heard from the environmental community loud and clear: You can take a huge step for the boreal forest by using recycled paper in your Charmin, Bounty and other tissue brands. As a consumer of tissue products, I, too, am calling on you to make this commitment.

    Sincerely,

  • Don't drill in Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments

    Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante are national treasures, home to flourishing ecosystems and stunning landscapes of arching, twisting red rock and sandstone.

    There's no question that the Trump administration's plan to open them up for mining and drilling would be catastrophic for these special places.

    I strongly oppose the Bureau of Land Management's plan to open up these monuments for extraction.

  • Tell Snapple to ditch their plastic bottles

    To Bob Gamgort, CEO of Keurig Dr. Pepper, owner of Snapple, Inc.

    Dear Mr. Gamgort,

    Snapple has long advertised its "All Natural" beverages as being "made from the best stuff on earth". So, we are dismayed that Snapple has used some of the worst stuff on earth -- petroleum-based plastic -- to make the bottles carrying your tea and juices. While the plastic is "recyclable", most of your bottles are probably not actually being "recycled". Instead, they are being tossed into landfills, even the ocean, where they end up as fodder for whales, turtles, and, eventually, you and I.

    We encourage you to shift back as quickly as possible to glass bottles, which are more easily recycled. In parts of Europe, the glass recycling rate is 90%. We also encourage you to support efforts to reduce the number of beverage containers used, to develop systems that facilitate reuse and recycling, and to create truly biodegradable containers.

  • Tell your Senators: Stop another Deepwater Horizon

    The Deepwater drilling disaster taught us that even one oil spill can exact an unbearable toll on our environment. But Trump administration plans would reverse restrictions put in place after Deepwater and open up the Atlantic and Pacific coasts to offshore drilling.

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill that would stop these plans in their tracks -- but now we need the Senate to act. Tell your senators to take action to protect our coasts today.

  • Tell your U.S. senators: Protect the Tongass National Forest

    The Tongass National Forest, a lush wilderness the size of West Virginia, is the crown jewel of the National Forest System. We need to stop the administration's plans to log this beautiful place.

    The U.S. Senate is considering legislation that would protect not only the Tongass, but also millions of acres of roadless national forest across America. Tell your senators to support this legislation today.

  • Support NOAA's proposal to expand protected habitat for Southern Resident orcas

    Dear NOAA Coordinator Lynne Barre,

    Just 73 Southern Resident orcas remain, the lowest number in more than three decades. Expanding orcas' habitat protection is critical to saving these extraordinary animals from habitat pollution and degradation -- threats that have amounted to a steady decline in population.

    To preserve biodiversity, prevent further pollution, and protect orcas for generations to come, I urge NOAA to expand critical habitat from the Salish Sea south along the coasts of Washington, Oregon and California for Southern Resident orcas.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell your governor: Commit to compost

    Instead of being returned to the earth where it can help things grow, our organic waste is piling up in trash dumps and fueling climate change -- 50 million tons of it in the U.S. alone each year.

    With just a little more effort, we can turn food scraps and lawn trimmings into valuable compost -- "black gold" as it's known by gardeners -- that could allow us to stop using polluting chemical fertilizers, replenish agricultural soil, and even protect our climate.

    Ask your governor to set a goal of composting 100 percent of all organic waste in your state today.

  • Tell your U.S. senators: Support a ban on drilling off Florida's Gulf coast

    The U.S. House of Representatives recently voted to permanently ban oil drilling off of the Gulf Coast. Now the Senate should approve it.

  • Call on the U.S. House of Representatives to protect endangered species

    The PAW and FIN Protection Act of 2019 would rescind the Trump administration's rollbacks to the Endangered Species Act, ensuring vulnerable wildlife receive the complete defense they deserve. Call on your U.S. representative to support this legislation today.

  • Tell the U.S. House of Representatives: Protect the Grand Canyon from toxic uranium mining

    Urge your U.S. representative to support the Grand Canyon Centennial Protection Act, which is scheduled for a vote as early as this week. If passed, this bill would permanently extend a moratorium on uranium mining to the north and south of the Grand Canyon.

  • Take action for the last wild red wolves

    It is the Fish and Wildlife Service's responsibility to protect and maintain the final remaining population of wild red wolves. With as few as 14 individuals left, it's now or never for this irreplaceable species. I strongly urge you to reveal the details of your current management activities to assure the public that you are doing all you can to keep the last wild red wolves safe.

    Sincerely,

  • Add your name: Support reintroduction of grizzly bears to the North Cascades

    Dear NPS Deputy Director Dan Smith,

    For thousands of years, grizzly bears have been an integral part of the North Cascades ecosystem. Now, fewer than ten grizzlies remain.

    In order to avoid the permanent loss of the grizzly bear in the region, I strongly urge you to finalize and implement a plan reintroducing grizzlies to the North Cascades National Park. This proposal will address the main threats to North Cascades grizzlies -- namely, their isolation and small population size -- thereby supporting species recovery.

    Please do all you can to ensure the North Cascades has grizzly bears for generations to come.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Bureau of Land Management: Oppose construction of Ambler Road

    Dear Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt,

    I strongly urge you to reject plans for the construction of Amber Road, a 211-mile private road that threatens the North Alaskan ecosystem.

    If built, Ambler Road would cross the Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, 2,900 streams and 11 major rivers. This route would interrupt the migration of the Western Arctic Caribou herd and threaten salmon and whitefish populations. After construction is complete and mining begins, acid mine drainage may contaminate waterways, poisoning fish and fauna for hundreds of years.

    The natural riches of the Alaskan wilderness landscape should not be sacrificed for mining firms' profits. Please stand against Ambler Road.

    Sincerely,

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • Thank Governor Polis for protecting wildlife corridors

    As Colorado's population grows and travel and development increase, the need for wildlife corridors to protect habitat becomes even more urgent. Thank Governor Jared Polis for taking executive action to conserve and expand wildlife corridors across the state.

  • "No Action" on Willow Project

    Docket No.: DOI-BLM-AK-0000-2018-0004-EIS

    The proposed Willow project could be devastating to the vulnerable wildlife that depend on the land -- such as the porcupine caribou, for which the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area has been a critical calving ground for centuries. This critical and irreplaceable land shouldn't be jeopardized by the construction of risky pipelines and drilling sites for more oil, especially when we have better, cleaner energy methods.

    I urge the Bureau of Land Management to protect this land, and the wildlife, by adapting the "no action" alternative.

    Sincerely,

  • Stop drilling in the Arctic Refuge

    In just a few days, the Trump administration plans to open up the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, America's largest wildlife sanctuary and one of our last pristine places, to oil and gas drilling. Add your voice by submitting your comment today.

  • Support the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposal to list Franklin's bumble bee as endangered.

    I strongly support the proposal to place Franklin's bumble bee on the Endangered Species List.

    Last seen in 2006, Franklin's bumble bee is considered imminently imperiled. Populations have been declining precipitously since 1998, and habitat loss, pesticides and pollution continually threaten its existence. Listing Franklin's bumble bee on the Endangered Species List is an important step toward raising awareness of the bee's critical status and ensuring protection.

  • Help save the monarch butterfly

    Dear USFWS Acting Director Greg Sheehan,

    Monarch butterflies are among nature's most incredible creatures, traveling thousands of miles each year to and from their winter home. They're also a critical part of our ecosystems, pollinating wildflowers and serving as important indicators of ecosystem health.

    Now, monarchs are in danger of disappearing. I urge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect these beautiful nomads by listing them as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

    Sincerely,

  • Tell the Environmental Protection Agency: Do not weaken regulations on toxic coal ash pollution

    Dear EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler,

    I strongly oppose all proposed changes to current coal ash regulations. Toxic coal ash, containing arsenic, mercury, lead and other carcinogens, threatens environmental and public health. With global warming increasing the frequency of heavier rains and storms, it is of the utmost importance the EPA takes action to mitigate the risk of coal ash polluting groundwater. Yet the proposed changes threaten to do the exact opposite. Without strong enforcement of storage regulations, and regular groundwater monitoring to assess potential contamination, people and animals will become poisoned by toxic ash.

    By signing this pledge, I affirm my opposition to the EPA's proposed rollbacks to the Coal Ash Rule.

    Sincerely,

  • Call on the Environmental Protection Agency to Ban Bee-Killing Neonicotinoids

    Neonicotinoids are a leading cause of international colony collapse. These toxic pesticides poison bees' central nervous systems, causing neurological damage, paralysis and death.

    Large-scale bee deaths have rippling effects throughout ecosystems. To protect bees and the food webs that depend on them, we are calling on the EPA to ban the most common and problematic uses of neonicotinoids.

  • Tell the Environmental Protection Agency not to weaken methane regulation

    I strongly urge you not to finalize planned rollbacks to the direct federal regulation of methane leaks from oil and gas facilities.

    The regulation and reduction of methane emissions is crucial to protecting our environment and combating global warming. Although methane accounts for less than ten percent of greenhouse gas emissions, it is responsible for more than a quarter of our planet's warming. These proposed rollbacks are estimated to increase emissions by hundreds of thousands of tons annually -- exponentially increasing the amount of heat trapped in our atmosphere and accelerating global warming. It is clear that methane emissions need to be decreased, not deregulated.

  • Tell the Army Corps of Engineers: Save Bristol Bay, stop Pebble Mine

    Bristol Bay's lush green landscape of wetlands and blooming tundra may soon be torn apart for a dangerous gold and copper mine.

    The Environmental Protection Agency has described Pebble Mine's draft environmental impact report as lacking key details and underestimating the risk for water quality and fish habitat in the Bristol Bay watershed. Open-pit mining in Bristol Bay would be extremely disruptive to the area, tearing up the land, polluting the water, and harming the wildlife, especially the salmon population.

    We shouldn't destroy the land, harm the wildlife, or risk the water quality of Bristol Bay for a mine. I urge you to halt the Pebble Mine project.

  • Tell Your U.S. Representative to Ground Space Billboards

    Is there anything that can't be turned into an ad trying to sell some product? A company wants to test that theory by putting huge billboards in orbit, visible in the evening sky to billions below. You can help stop them.

  • Tell your U.S. Senators: Support the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act of 2019

    More than half a million species are at risk of extinction -- and habitat loss is a leading cause. Urge your U.S. senators to support the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act of 2019, which will connect protected areas and support animal migration across the country

  • Tell your governor: Ban the use of sulfoxaflor pesticides

    Call on your governor to commit to protecting bees by banning sulfoxaflor unless and until proven nontoxic.

  • Protect the Alexander Archipelago wolf

    The Alexander Archipelago wolf, notably smaller in size and weight and darker in color, is one of the world's rarest wolf subspecies. The wolves have been in decline since logging began in the Tongass National Forest in the 1990's, and with the state of Alaska and the logging industry moving to open more of the Tongass up to logging, the wolves are at an even greater risk.

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seriously considered listing the Alexander Archipelago wolves as endangered or threatened in 2016, but decided against it. With the current estimated population at fewer than 200 wolves and an increased threat of logging, it's time the FWS reconsiders.

  • Tell Congress: Protect lions from trophy hunting

    With lion populations dropping, we need to be working to preserve lions, not hunting them for sport. Tell Congress to support the CECIL Act today.

  • Stop Wolf Killing in Washington State

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) killed one member of the Old Profanity Territory wolf pack last month, and now they plan to kill even more. Tell the director of WDFW that wolf killing is not the right way to manage this endangered species.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell Congress: Stop Rollbacks to the Endangered Species Act

    The Trump administration just finalized changes to the Endangered Species Act that will put endangered animals on the chopping block. Under the new rules, imperiled animals can be refused protection for the sake of oil and gas profits.

    Extinction is forever, and the Endangered Species Act is the best tool we have to protect our nation's most vulnerable wildlife. Send a message today urging Congress to stand up for endangered animals and overturn this rollback of the Endangered Species Act.

  • No Leasing in Wildlife Corridors

    Nearly one quarter of all new oil and gas leases issued by the BLM in the last two years have been within wildlife corridors or priority conservation areas. Wildlife corridors are for wildlife, not for oil and gas extraction. I oppose oil and gas leasing in these important protected habitats.

  • Tell your governor: Create bee-friendly habitats on public lands

    Call on your governor to commit to conserving bees by providing native plants and nesting blocks in public lands.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Tell the Senate: Support the Grand Canyon Centennial Protection Act

    Ask your senators to permanently protect 1 million acres of public land adjacent to the Grand Canyon from toxic uranium mining.

  • Tell the Bureau of Land Management: Don't expand coal mining in Colorado

    I strongly urge you not to finalize a plan that would expand coal mining in southwestern Colorado.

    Coal mining is a dirty, dangerous process that has been proven to result in deforestation, habitat degradation, water contamination and air pollution. Colorado already has the scars of mining. Across the state, over 23,000 mines are abandoned and 1,800 miles of streams have been contaminated by mine pollution. In an already damaged environment, more mining is the last thing we need.

  • Save the Southern Resident orcas

    Make sure saving the Southern Resident orcas is a priority. Tell Sens. Cantwell and Murray to support the removal of the Lower Snake River dams and restoration of Chinook salmon populations.

    Sign up here for instructions.

  • Tell your state legislators: Support a statewide ban on the worst single-use plastics

    So much plastic ends up in our oceans that it's washing ashore and creating a new form of plastic pollution. In just a few years, 'plasticrust' has coated almost 10 percent of shoreline rocks on the island where it was discovered.

    We can't keep ignoring the signs of this growing plastic epidemic that we've created for ourselves. And we can greatly reduce the problem with one simple fix: Stop using single use plastics.

    Tell your state legislators to support a statewide ban on the worst single-use plastics in your state.

  • Tell the USDA to resume honeybee tracking

    Ask the U.S. Department of Agriculture to resume data collection for its annual Honey Bee Colonies report, which can be used by scientists and beekeepers to analyze the effects of climate change and pesticides on bees.

  • Send a message to your U.S. House Representative to ban neonics in National Wildlife Refuges

    Protect bees from toxic pesticides in 150 million acres across the nation by sending a message to your U.S. representative today.

  • Tell the EPA: Stop the Taylor Energy oil leak

    Months ago news broke that an oil rig has been leaking oil into the Gulf of Mexico for the past 14 years. Now, a new study estimates that the rig is leaking 4,500 gallons of oil a day -- not the two to four gallons that the owner claimed.

    Taylor Energy Co. has been fighting a federal order to stop the leak, while the oil has been putting wildlife at risk. We need to tell the Environmental Protection Agency to protect the Gulf and enforce the order.

  • Stop drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Opening up the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling will have disastrous effects on wildlife before any drilling even begins. The low-flying planes repeatedly surveying the refuge will still disturb polar bears, caribou and seals.

    This method of searching for oil will scare caribou and seals away -- deserting the territory crucial to their way of life -- and can cause polar bears to abandon the coastline of the plain where they should be denning with their cubs.

  • Tell Congress: Support the Roadless Area Conservation Act of 2019

    The Tongass National Forest is the world's largest remaining temperate rainforest and is home to bald eagles, deer and more bears than people. All of this is at risk if roadbuilding, logging and mining invade the forest.

    The Roadless Area Conservation Act would permanently uphold the protections of the Roadless Rule for almost 60 million acres of our national forests, some of the last remaining truly wild spaces left. Tell your U.S. representative to support the Roadless Area Conservation Act of 2019.

  • Tell Congress: Protect the North Atlantic Right Whale

    Human activity has pushed the North Atlantic right whale to the brink of extinction, but there's still hope. Tell your representative to support the SAVE Right Whales Act.

  • Save Wolves and other Wildlife from Deadly Cyanide Bombs

    An animal that triggers a "cyanide bomb" can asphyxiate and die in just minutes. These deadly traps don't discriminate -- they've poisoned people and killed animals from pet dogs to endangered wolves. It's past time to ban them nationwide.

    Send a message to your U.S. representative urging them to support HR 2471, a bill that will end the use of cyanide bombs for predator control across the country.

  • Tell Washington's Senators: The Nation Wants to Save Southern Resident Orcas

    Dear Sens. Cantwell and Murray,

    Southern Resident orcas are starving. Fewer than 80 remain in the wild today. To save them, we know we need to save their food source -- Chinook salmon.

    But since the construction of the Lower Snake River dams, the salmon population has dropped alarmingly. I urge you to bring breaching these dams to Congress in order to restore the salmon population that these orcas need to survive and thrive.

    Sincerely,

  • Protect birds from bright lights in the big city

    Dear Mayor Lightfoot,

    Recent studies have shown that Chicago is, in the words of the Chicago Tribune, "the most dangerous metropolitan area in the contiguous U.S. for migratory birds". Tens of thousands of birds die every year in your city because they collide with buildings, having been attracted by bright lights, like moths to a flame. Voluntary programs to reduce lighting have made only a small dent in the number of deaths. It's time now to take stronger action, by supporting the "Bird-Friendly Design Ordinance", now being considered by the City Council. If passed, Chicago will not only save many birds' lives in your city. It will be a shining example to the cities and towns throughout the country in which we live.

  • Tell your senators: Support the Stop Arctic Ocean Drilling Act of 2019

    Offshore drilling in any ocean is dangerous. But in the Arctic Ocean, where so many animals depend on the sea and ice cover, oil spills can be especially disastrous. The Arctic Ocean is home to invaluable and fragile ecosystems that are critical to whales, walruses, polar bears and more.

    Together, we can protect Arctic wildlife and put an end to drilling in the Arctic Ocean with the Stop Arctic Ocean Drilling Act of 2019.

  • No Mining Near Yellowstone

    The greater Yellowstone area, with the National Park at its heart, is one of the largest and most intact temperate ecosystems in the world. Its sprawling acres contain incredible wonders, from spectacular geysers to lush forests. In addition to its famous wolves, Yellowstone is home to rare wildlife that requires vast undisturbed habitats to thrive, like lynx and wolverines. Mining on Yellowstone's northern border would harm this delicate and irreplaceable ecosystem, changing it forever. I strongly urge you not to permit the Crevice Mountain Mine project.

  • Stop Mining Near the Boundary Waters

    This new legislation will stop mining and leasing from moving forward near the Boundary Waters, and require the completion of a vital environmental impact study. Send a message to your U.S. representative today urging them to support efforts to keep the Boundary Waters safe.

  • Act today to protect lions

    We need to do everything we can to preserve and enlarge lions' natural habitat, and create systems that encourage people to protect, not kill these creatures. Tell your representative to support the CECIL Act today.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.

  • Sign the Petition: Protect the Environment from Toxic Coal Ash

    President Trump,

    We, the undersigned, strongly urge you to comply with the U.S. District Court of the District of Columbia ruling requiring stronger regulations to prevent coal ash pollution. Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury and other heavy metals, which can seep into local groundwater, increasing cancer risks in local communities, damaging people's organs and poisoning people and animals. To address this threat, we urge your administration to restore and fully implement the 2015 coal ash storage rule.